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Suppose there is a table with only two columns (an example is shown below). Every '1' entry should be followed (in the sorted order given below) by a '0'. However, as you can see, in the table, there are some 'orphans' where there are two consecutive '1's.

How can I create a query that returns all the rows, except for the first of any consecutive '1's? (This would reduce the example below from 16 rows to 14)

1 E
0 A
1 T
0 S
1 R
0 E
1 F
0 T
1 G
1 T
0 R
1 X
1 R
0 R
1 E
0 T

I'm going to try and clarify my problem, I think that above I simplified it too much. Imagine one table called logs, with four columns:

  • user (a string containing a username)
  • machine (a string uniquely identifying various PCs)
  • type (event's type: a 1 for login and a 0 for logout)
  • time (the time of the event being logged)

[The machine/time pair provides a unique key, as no machine can be logged in or out of twice at the same instant. Presumably an 'ID' column could be artificially created based on machine/time sort if needed.]

The idea is that every login event should be accompanied by a logout event. In an ideal word it would be fairly easy to match logins to logouts, and hence analyse the time spent logged in.

However, in the case of a power cut, the logout will not be recorded. Therefore (considering only one machine's data, sorted by time) if there are two login events in a row, we want to ignore the first login, because we don't have any reliable data from it. This is the problem I am trying to solve.

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SQL tables have no order. Wanting a row being followed by another row has no sense. If you want a natural order use an id. –  Benoit Nov 16 '11 at 9:58
    
How is the ordering achieved? We can assume an additional id column for that? –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 16 '11 at 9:58
    
@Erwin, Yes there are some other columns (that provide the sort order) that I am ignoring (because I thought that would make things more simple, and focus on the problem) –  8128 Nov 16 '11 at 10:00
    
@fluteflute, since the ID is essential in determining the 'next' record in the sequence, it is an essential part of the problem. Benoit has posted a solution that relies on IDs being an unbroken sequence of numbers iterated by 1 - is this realistic? –  Mark Bannister Nov 16 '11 at 10:12
2  
Also, table and column names would help. –  Mark Bannister Nov 16 '11 at 10:12

4 Answers 4

Provided, that

  • only 1's are dupes, never 0's
  • You want to get rid of all the first 1's if there are more.

Your text says "except for the first of any consecutive", but I think, this is what you want. Or there can only ever be 2, then it is the same.

SELECT x.*
FROM   x
LEFT   JOIN x y on y.id = (x.id + 1)
WHERE  (x.nr = y.nr) IS NOT TRUE -- OR x.nr = 0
ORDER  BY x.id

If you want to preserve double 0's, use the commented clause additionally, but probably not needed.

Edit after question edit:

You may want to add an auto-increment column to your data to make this simpler: Generate (i.e. write) a row number index column in MySQL

Other RDBMS (PostgreSQL, Oracle, SQL Server, ..) have window functions like row_number() or lag() and lead() that make such an operation much easier.

share|improve this answer
    
The commented clause appears to be needed, otherwise the last item in the table (a '0' is removed) –  8128 Nov 16 '11 at 11:38
    
@fluteflute: there must be an error of some kind. y.nr for the "last" row (greatest x.id) is NULL, therefore (x.nr = y.nr) IS NOT TRUE evaluates to TRUE. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 16 '11 at 11:57

Assuming you get an id (add column, set column id = record number in database) use:

select a.*
  from the_table a
  left join the_table b on b.id = a.id + 1
                       and b.col1 = 0
 where a.col1 = 1
   and b.id is null
share|improve this answer
    
The where condition should be where (a.col1 = 1 and b.id is null) or a.col1 = 0 - fluteflute wants to include 0s. –  Mark Bannister Nov 16 '11 at 10:16

Try:

select l.*
from logs l
where l.type = 0 or
      not (select type
           from (select * from logs order by `time` desc) n
           where n.machine = l.machine and
                 n.user = l.user and
                 n.time > l.time)
           group by () )
share|improve this answer

USING a CTE to separate the lag-logic from the selection criteria.

DROP TABLE tmp.bits;
CREATE TABLE tmp.bits
    ( id SERIAL NOT NULL
    , bit INTEGER NOT NULL
    , code CHAR(1)
    );
INSERT INTO tmp.bits(bit, code) VALUES
(1, 'T' )
, (0, 'S' )
, (1, 'R' )
, (0, 'E' )
, (1, 'F' )
, (0, 'T' )
, (1, 'G' )
, (1, 'T' )
, (0, 'R' )
, (1, 'X' )
, (1, 'R' )
, (0, 'R' )
, (1, 'E' )
, (0, 'T' )
    ;

SET search_path='tmp';
SELECT * FROM bits;

-- EXPLAIN ANALYZE
WITH prevnext AS (
SELECT
    bt.id AS thisid
    , bt.bit  AS thisbit
    , bt.code AS thiscode
    , bp.bit AS prevbit
    , bp.code AS prevcode
    FROM bits bt
    LEFT JOIN bits bp ON (bt.id > bp.id)
    AND NOT EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM bits nx
        WHERE nx.id > bp.id
        AND nx.id < bt.id
        )   
    )
SELECT thisid, thisbit, thiscode
FROM prevnext
WHERE thisbit=0
OR prevbit IS NULL OR thisbit <> prevbit
    ;

EDIT:

for those poor soals that cannot use CTEs, it is easy to create a view instead:

CREATE VIEW prevnext AS (
SELECT
    bt.id AS thisid
    , bt.bit  AS thisbit
    ,bt.code AS thiscode
    , bp.bit AS prevbit
    , bp.code AS prevcode
    FROM bits bt
    LEFT JOIN bits bp ON (bt.id > bp.id)
    AND NOT EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM bits nx
        WHERE nx.id > bp.id
        AND nx.id < bt.id
        )
    )
    ;
SELECT thisid, thisbit, thiscode
FROM prevnext
WHERE thisbit=0
OR prevbit IS NULL OR thisbit <> prevbit
    ;
share|improve this answer
1  
Except that we are talking MySQL here. No CTE, no window functions. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 16 '11 at 11:59
    
I know, but the problem is very general (and tagged sql), besides: the CTE could always be wrapped into view. –  wildplasser Nov 16 '11 at 12:02
    
There you go. Hoppa! –  wildplasser Nov 16 '11 at 12:09

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