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What is the meaning of internal profile or external profile in Free Switch?

Also I don't know the meaning of -

application="bridge". 

I also cannot understand

data="${sofia_contact($${gwuser}@$${domain})}"  

or

data="sofia/internal/${destnumber}@192.168.10.33:5062"

It will be really helpful if someone could give me a proper explanation, or at least, point me to a right direction.

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Application bridge connects two channels(end-points) together.

sofia_* is the open source SIP protocol implementation developed by Nokia guys. So, $${gwuser} is variable which contains the name of the user to call in SIP address notation: name@domain. ${domain} is the domain name. sofia/internal/<adress> means that will be used internal sip number which is handled by local freeswitch PBX.

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I think you should clarify a bit how freeswitch (mod_sofia) consider locally registered endpoints vs gateways: http://wiki.freeswitch.org/wiki/Mod_sofia

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"internal" and "external" are names of sip profiles. Those are usually defined in the default configuration of freeswitch. They are sample configurations optimized for internal or external access, you can define other sip profiles with a configuration according to your needs.

application="bridge" is an application that bridges an incoming call to an other external or internal destination.

data="sofia/internal/${destnumber}@192.168.10.33:5062" means you want to use the sofia sipstack, the sip profile with the name "internal" with the content of the variable "destnumber" to ip 192.168.10.3 on port 5062.

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