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Breaking out of a nested loop

I got somthing like (to simplify)

foreach (...)
{
    foreach (...)
    {
        //Some code

        if (statement)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
}

The thing is that I want my statement to leave for the double-foreach loop ! I'm thinking about a sort of "break flag" as a boolean but is there any way to avoid that ?

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marked as duplicate by sll, jgauffin, Andreas Niedermair, pratap k, Yakimych Nov 16 '11 at 11:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You can avoid it by using Linq and SelectMany to make this a single for-each loop instead of a nested loop. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 16 '11 at 11:02
1  
"break flag" or GOTO –  relaxxx Nov 16 '11 at 11:03
    
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham : dont know anything about it, giving a look at it ! –  Guillaume Slashy Nov 16 '11 at 11:04
    
@relaxxx : feels like I'll gotta use a breakflag as I was thinking so :( –  Guillaume Slashy Nov 16 '11 at 11:06
    
@GuillaumeCogranne why is useage of a breakflag so much unwanted for you? It is common solution. –  relaxxx Nov 16 '11 at 11:10

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could avoid the nested loop entirely by using Linq and SelectMany.

Instead of:

foreach(var value in someValues)
{
    foreach(var subValue in value.SubValues)
    {
        // ...
        break;
    }
}

Your code would become:

foreach(var subValue in someValues.SelectMany(v => v.SubValues))
{
    // ...
    break;
}

If you need some logic to select whether or not you loop over SubValues, throw that logic in an additional Where clause.

Instead of

foreach(var value in someValues)
{
    if(value.IsMumsHairGreenToday)
    {
        foreach(var subValue in value.SubValues)
        {
            // ...
            break;
        }
    }
}

You can write:

var subValues = someValues
    .Where(v => v.IsMumsHairGreenToday)
    .SelectMany(v => v.SubValues)
    ;

foreach(var subValue in subValues)
{
    // ...
    break;
}
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Im not confortable with lambda expressions so didnt think about doing this, sounds nice as I avoid the breakflag and use a GOTO ! –  Guillaume Slashy Nov 16 '11 at 11:10
3  
@GuillaumeCogranne: You will never get comfortable until you use them all the time. BTW: Please, don't ever use goto. I don't care what the crowd says. It is just sinful :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 16 '11 at 11:12

You may use goto.

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7  
Interesting - just mentioning goto causes immediate automatic downvotes ;) However weird it may sound, but exiting outer loops is done cleaner with goto than without it, so that's one scenario where using it is indeed justifyable. +1 –  Yakimych Nov 16 '11 at 11:06
2  
I don't like 'int' going to use for everything 'double' instead ;) –  dowhilefor Nov 16 '11 at 11:09
1  
I don't like goto, but this could be the only case in which it's to be used! Upvoted! –  Marco Nov 16 '11 at 11:09
1  
@jgauffin : I remembered rule DO NOT USE goto for flow control from university time studying Borland Pascal on the first course, I feel this rule makes sense and I treat goto as bad practice –  sll Nov 16 '11 at 11:11
3  
@Andras Zoltan: Since we all born without any specific knowledges we are learn it from somewhere like development in university as a case, so this is original source where from knowledges may come into our minds and build/form our vision. So this is MY OWN point of view for this case. Even so I just suggesting not using it but understand another's point of view so I'm not downvoting such answers even I do not like it becuase it solves problem represented by the question –  sll Nov 16 '11 at 11:28

You could try:

bool leave = false;
foreach (...)
{
    foreach (...)
    {
        //Some code

        if (statement)
        {
            leave = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (leave) break;
}

edit: moved the break flag

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1  
yep that's the "breakflag" I was talking about but dont like it -_- –  Guillaume Slashy Nov 16 '11 at 11:03
    
@GuillaumeCogranne: ops, I didn't read about it... –  Marco Nov 16 '11 at 11:04

Sure, you should check goto.

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Can any downvoter please elaborate why you did that? –  DanielB Nov 16 '11 at 11:05
1  
Who and why did downvote that? Just because its common "logic" that goto is evil? No! Its not! It is still in the language for a reason and it sometimes, while rare i agree, it is useful. –  dowhilefor Nov 16 '11 at 11:06
2  
don't agree with the -2 here - he has a valid point :) –  Andras Zoltan Nov 16 '11 at 11:08

As break only breaks out of the current loop you are going to have to test the break condition in the outer loop as well - unless you use a goto statement.

A variable would seem the best way of doing this.

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Imo one of the few cases where a careful goto is fine.

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you could encapsulate that logic in a method and return at the break point:

private SomeType CheckIfConditionOfNestedItems(IEnumerable enumerable)
{
    foreach (var thing in enumerable )
    {
        foreach (...)
        {
            //Some code

            if (statement)
            {
                return result;
            }
        }
    }
}

obviously this might need you to change your code a little, but this also has the advantage that it probably makes the code where you have the double loop much more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
doesnt fit well with my code -_- –  Guillaume Slashy Nov 16 '11 at 11:05

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