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I'm currently building my first project in MVC 3 which I find quite straightforward by following the tutorials and videos supplied by microsoft. However there's one thing that despite all my reading up on the subject; I fail to grasp.

A vast number of functions are controlled using Attributes, eg. display name, validation data, etc, and in your hand written code these are used on your class properties by simply typing in the attribute in [] tags above the class declaration. Simple as that. On my main class called Users I woud eg use:

[DisplayName("Password")]
[DataType(DataType.Password)]
public string Password { get; set; }

The problem though is that I have chosen to build my classes in the designer using the edmx model (or actually it's built by updating from the database). This means the code files are automatically generated so if I type my attribute tags in there they'll be overwritten as soon as I update the model. Where do I add these?

This should really be a common problem, but I can't seem to find the proper solution.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll have to create a partial class in a different file that references the autogenerated class. This is one reason why EF Code First is nice - no need for the extra file. I'm using EF DB First, which puts me in the same boat as you. Here is one way to make this work (I'm sure there are others as well):

Let's say your EF generated class is called Customer.

namespace YourNamespace
{
    public partial class Customer
    {   
        public string Password { get; set; }
    }
}

Create another class (I put it in the Models folder). For example, Customer_Model.cs:

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

namespace YourNamespace
{
    [MetadataType(typeof(Customer_Attributes))]
    public partial class Customer
    {
        //define some functions here if you wish
    }

    public class Customer_Attributes
    {
        [DisplayName("Password")]
        [DataType(DataType.Password)]
        public string Password { get; set; }
    }
}
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Works like a dream! Thx! Kohan has a good point though below when stating that it can be annoying having to add every single property in the attributes class, even those without attributes. –  Don Simon Nov 16 '11 at 13:32

You should create a view model and have the attributes on there:

So you would have a new class called UserViewModel (or something)

public class UserViewModel
{
    public int Id {get;set;}

    [DisplayName("Password")]
    [DataType(DataType.Password)]
    public string Password { get; set; }

    [DisplayName("User Name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public UserViewModel(User user)
    {
        this.Id = user.Id;
        this.Password = user.Password;
        this.Name = user.Name;
    }

    public UserViewModel() { }
}

You can then send this down to the view instead of your user object. This is better also as you might not want to use ALL of the properties on user, and so here you only need to send what you need.

As Requested

Controller:

    public ActionResult Edit(int id)
    {
        //takes a user
        User user = this.UserRepository.GetById(id); 
        //maps to viewmodel by passing in a user ... see viewmodel above.
        var model = new UserViewModel(user);

        //returns a viewmodel not a user
        return View(model);
    }


    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Edit(UserViewModel model)
    {
        //check validation
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            // get the user
            User user = this.UserRepository.GetById(model.Id);
            //update the properties
            user.Name = model.Name;
            user.Password = model.Password;

            //redirect back to index or a success page if you prefer.
            return RedirectToAction("Index");
        }

        return View();
    }

View:

    @model ViewModels.User.UserViewModel
    @{
        ViewBag.Title = "Edit";
        Layout = "~/Views/Shared/MasterPages/_Layout.cshtml";
    }

    @Html.HiddenFor(x => x.Id)
    @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Name)
    @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Password)
share|improve this answer
    
Good point about not needing all properties. I'm not 100% sure on how to use this though... I take it the new UserViewModel class is the one to be used in the code. How is this class connected to the original User class? Wouldn't we need to implement set and get methods passing on the data between the two classes data in that case? –  Don Simon Nov 16 '11 at 13:39
    
Yes, for typical user functionality you would have your controller get the user that you wanted, you would then declare a new model = new UserViewModel(user) and pass in the user object. As you can see above this can then be used to set the properties on the viewmodel. Send this down to the view, not the user itself. Then when posting back the changes you can set the user properties to the models ones. I can post some more code above if you require. –  4imble Nov 16 '11 at 15:14
    
I do get the main idea, but please do post some code on how to execute it. How does the view get the UserViewModel object? After that is fixed I guess the HttpPost ActionResult takes an instance of UserViewModel and writes it's values to the db object, right? –  Don Simon Nov 16 '11 at 15:47
    
yeap, that's right, see the code i've added. –  4imble Nov 16 '11 at 16:32
    
Got it, thank you very much! –  Don Simon Nov 17 '11 at 9:39

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