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I've come up across a strange behaviour of std::set.

Here is the code:

#include <cstdio>
#include <windows.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include <vector>
#include <set>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    set<int> b[100];

    for (int o=0; o<10; o++)
    {
        int tt = GetTickCount();

        for (int i=0; i<5000000; i++)
        {
            b[o].insert(i);
        }

        tt = GetTickCount() - tt;

        b[o].clear();

        printf("%d\n", tt);
    }

    return 0;
}

I'm running on Windows XP.

Here is the interesting part: this first printed time is about 3500 ms, while all next are over 9000 ms! Why is that happening?

Oh, and this only happens on release version (-O2 optimization).

It doesn't happen on Linux (after changing code to compile there).

One more thing: when I run it while profiling with Intel VTune it always takes about 3000 ms, so it's the way it should be.

UPDATE: Here is some new code:

#include <cstdio>
#include <windows.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
const int count = 10000000;
int **a = new int*[count];

for (int o=0; o<10; o++)
{
    int ttt = GetTickCount();

    for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
    {
        a[i] = new int;

        *a[i] = i;
    }

    int ttt2 = GetTickCount();

    for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
    {
        int r1 = rand() * 10000 + rand();
        int r2 = rand() * 10000 + rand();
        r1 = r1%count;
        r2 = r2%count;

        int *e = a[r1];
        a[r1] = a[r2];
        a[r2] = e;
    }

    int ttt3 = GetTickCount();

    for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
    {
        delete a[i];
    }

    int ttt4 = GetTickCount();

    printf("%d %d\n", ttt2-ttt, ttt4-ttt3);
}

return 0;
}

This is the same problem. What happens is I allocate many many small objects and then delete them in random order - so it is similar to how it looks in std::set. So this is Windows memory management problem. It can't really handle well many small allocs and deletes.

share|improve this question
    
This is probably related to some implementation details of your standard library/platform. You could try to run it in a profiler and check where the time is being spent. There can be many things going on, from differences in the allocation scheme of the first and consecutive passes (you released the memory) to just about anything else. Also note that you should use -O3 for performance. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 16 '11 at 12:04
1  
Perhaps it's related to the system thread scheduling. Your thread is not the only one that needs processor time. You may use GetThreadTimes to see how much processor time your thread actually consumed –  valdo Nov 16 '11 at 12:06
    
Your best bet might be to look at the assembly code generated with -O2 to see if there's anything there that might explain this behaviour. –  NPE Nov 16 '11 at 12:09
    
GetTickCount function: The resolution of the GetTickCount function is limited to the resolution of the system timer, which is typically in the range of 10 milliseconds to 16 milliseconds. ... If you need a higher resolution timer, use a multimedia timer or a high-resolution timer. -- Just saying. Maybe you can try with different timers. –  Martin Ba Nov 16 '11 at 12:22
1  
@valdo: Nominally not. But if I learned one thing, it's not to trust timers and performance measurements unless they return consistent results over a large set of machines and permutations. This -- superficially -- doesn't return consistent results: So it could be anything as far as I'm concerned. –  Martin Ba Nov 16 '11 at 12:28
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2 Answers

I cannot explain exactly why this is happening but I could propose a solution. I've been able to reproduce this on my PC when I run the release build under the debugger (with F5). When I run the build from the command line or with Ctrl-F5 I don't get that kind of behavior.

This has something to do with the debug heap which is on by default when you launch under the debugger. It's described in great detail here. To prevent this from happening either

  1. Run from the command line or with Ctrl-F5 (Debug -> Start Without Debugging).
  2. Go to Project -> Properties -> Debugging -> Environment and add _NO_DEBUG_HEAP=1.

If I had to guess I would say that it has something to do with the implementation of the memory allocation tracking in Windows/VS runtime. Probably some internal lists fill up and reallocate or something else along these lines.

share|improve this answer
    
This _NO_DEBUG_HEAP option is new to me. Nice answer. –  Dialecticus Nov 16 '11 at 16:25
    
I always run it without the debugger, so it's not the issue. I've tested it with VS2010 and it works ok (no abnomalies), but on VS2008 is works bad. BUT, the second code I provided works bad on VS2008 and on VS2010. Note to all: VS2010 implementation of STL library (especially of set) is MUCH betten than in VS2008, which don't meet the official STL specification in terms of complexity (for example: insertion of vector of elements into the set, they forgot to use insert(end(), element) (which may be O(1) and they use insert(element) (always O(logN)) –  tweety3d Nov 16 '11 at 16:43
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I think std::set is implemented as a binary search tree. Since you are increasing i by 1 every time you are essentially creating an adversarial (worst case) scenario for this type of datastructure (rebalancing of the tree is required on almost every insert).

Also, it is 50 million inserts, so some time is expected, though I wouldn't think it would be 5 ms.

Also, I would do your "clear" after you print your time, as I don't see the reason you would benchmark both inserting and removing items.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, clearing whole set is 3 - 10 times slower than adding everything. This happens because Windows memory manager makes it so slow. –  tweety3d Nov 18 '11 at 12:19
    
@tweety3d Any idea why clear it is so slow? I'd imagine the removal would be linear time regardless, does windows abstract the underlying data structure? –  Alex Nov 18 '11 at 13:41
    
It is probably because memory manager is optimized to make fast allocs, so the whole processing of rearranging its pointers/iterating lists/joining freed spaces is done in deallocator. –  tweety3d Nov 21 '11 at 11:04
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