Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is code from the book sample:

new AlertDialog.Builder(this)
    .setTitle(getResources().getString(R.string.alert_label))
    .setMessage(validationText.toString())
    .setPositiveButton("Continue", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int arg1) {
           // in this case, don't need to do anything other than close alert
        }
    })
.show();

I want to understand this code, please rewrite it in several statements, so that each statement makes exactly one operation. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
i edited your code .. check it! its easy to understand –  Sherif elKhatib Nov 16 '11 at 11:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
// Create a builder
AlertDialog.Builder adb = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);

// Set a title
adb.setTitle(getResources().getString(R.string.alert_label));

// Set the dialogs message
adb.setMessage(validationText.toString());

// Set label and even handling of the "positive button"
// 
// NOTE: If you don't want to do anything here except to close the dlg 
// use the next line instead (you don't have to specifiy an event handler)
// adb.setPositiveButton("Continue", null);

adb.setPositiveButton("Continue",
    new android.content.DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int arg1) {
       // in this case, don't need to do anything other than close alert
    }
    });

// Show the dialog
adb.show();

Seperate statements, each executed on a normal builder object.

Alternatively you can chain builder methods to save a few chars (like your orginal source), though you can write it more readable. To do so remove the semicolons and the object reference at the beginning of each line. Each builder method returns the original builder object, which you can use to run the next statement on it.

Here's a small, better readable example for that:

new AlertDialog.Builder(this)
.setTitle("Title")
.setMessage("42 is the answer")
.show();
share|improve this answer

AlertDialog.Builder has numerous methods that all return the AlertDialog.Builder they operate on.

This allows you to write:

builder.A();
builder.B();
builder.C() ;

as

builder.A().B().C();

I find this extra annoying, but that's just me.

share|improve this answer
AlerDialog.Builder d = new AlertDialog.Builder(this); // get an Object of AlertDialog.Builder

d.setTitle(getResources().getString(R.string.alert_label)); //Set its title

d.setMessage(validationText.toString()); //set message body

d.setPositiveButton("Continue",new android.content.DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int arg1) {
       // in this case, don't need to do anything other than close alert
    }
 }); //this dialog will have single button called Continue

d.show(); // this pops up the dialog..
share|improve this answer

This technic is known as Method chaining

share|improve this answer

try putting line breaks before each . Then it'll be more readable.

new AlertDialog.Builder(this)
.setTitle(

getResources().getString(R.string.alert_label))

.setMessage(validationText.toString()).setPositiveButton("Continue",

new android.content.DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
 public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int arg1) {
   // in this case, don't need to do anything other than close alert
 }
 })
.show();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.