Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is driving me crazy: I simply want Emacs to maximize to whatever screen resolution I have at startup. Ideally I like a cross-platform (Windows & Linux) solution that works on any screen resolution, but I can't even get it to work on just Window XP with even hard-coded sizes.

Here are what I tried:

  1. Setting the initial-frame-alist with appropriate height/width
  2. Setting the default-frame-alist
  3. (Windows specific stuff) Sending message to the emacs windows telling it to maximize via (w32-send-sys-command 61488)
  4. Tried this function which I found somewhere:

    (defun toggle-fullscreen ()
      "toggles whether the currently selected frame consumes the entire display
    or is decorated with a window border"
      (interactive)
      (let ((f (selected-frame)))
        (modify-frame-parameters 
         f
         `((fullscreen . ,(if (eq nil (frame-parameter f 'fullscreen)) 
                              'fullboth
                            nil))))))
    
  5. Tried the above methods in both beginning and end of my init file to try to eliminate interference from other init things.

Unfortunately, none of the above works!! For some of the above, I can see my emacs windows resizes correctly for a split second before reverting back to the smallish default size. And if I run the methods above after the initialization, the emacs windows DOES resize correctly. What in the world is going on here?

[p.s. there are other SO questions on this but none of the answers work]


Update:

The answers make me think that something else in my init file is causing the problem. And indeed it is! After some try-and-error, I found the culprit. If I commented out the following line, everything works perfectly:

(tool-bar-mode -1)

What in the world does the toolbar have to do with maximizing windows?

So the question now is: how can I disable toolbar (after all, emacs's toolbar is ugly and takes up precious screen real-estate) AND maximize the windows both in my init file? It is possibly a bug that toolbar interferes with the windows size?

Clarification: (tool-bar-mode -1) turns the toolbar off, but this line interferes with maximizing the Emacs windows. So if I try put functions to maximize windows and turn off the toolbar, the maximize part will fail; if the toolbar part is commented out, then the maximize part will work ok. It does not even matter what solutions I use (among the 4 that I listed).


Solution: (or at least what work for me now)

This is probably a bug in Emacs. The workaround is to disable the toolbar through the Registry, not in .emacs. Save the following as a .reg file, and execute that file in Windows Explorer:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\GNU\Emacs]
"Emacs.Toolbar"="-1"

(This solution is a working version of what OtherMichael suggested).

share|improve this question
    
Are you starting emacs via shortcut or from the command line? –  Sean Bright May 2 '09 at 18:25
    
I start it with the runemacs.exe wrapper, which, if I understand correctly, just launch the emacs binary without a command line prompt on Windows. If you are about to suggest the -geometry option, that is not useful to me since I have too many places that start emacs independently with other options and changing all of them to include -geometry option is not practical... –  polyglot May 2 '09 at 18:50
    
Was going to suggest -fs, but same difference in terms of practicality. –  Sean Bright May 2 '09 at 19:33

13 Answers 13

up vote 23 down vote accepted

I found an answer a year-or-so back that explains you have to manipulate the registry to do things right:

To start Emacs maximized put this line at the end of your ~/.emacs file:

(w32-send-sys-command 61488)

If you don't want the Emacs tool bar you can add the line (tool-bar-mode -1) [NOTE: value is 0 on original page] to your ~/.emacs file but Emacs won't fully maximize in this case - the real estate occupied by the tool bar is lost. You have to disable the tool bar in the registry to get it back:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\GNU\Emacs\Emacs.Toolbar]
@="0"

If you look in the EmacsWiki under W32SendSys command-codes you'll find that 61488 is maximize current frame

share|improve this answer
    
I already have the w32-send-sys-command in my .emacs file, and it works ONLY IF I did not specify (tool-bar-mode -1) in my .emacs file somewhere. The registry trick to turn off toolbar does not work for me, though... –  polyglot May 4 '09 at 21:50
    
After some tinkering, I find out that instead of creating a key, Emacs will response to Emacs.Toolbar as a value inside the Emacs key. Also the value should be -1. Then voila, finally! I posted a working solution in my question as an update. –  polyglot May 4 '09 at 22:00
    
I double-checked, and while the original page does say (tool-bar-mode 0), my .emacs has (tool-bar-mode -1); now reflected above. However, my registry value is still 0, not -1. hunh. –  Michael Paulukonis May 5 '09 at 12:23
    
I wish I could award a double thumbs up!!!! Thank you so very much!!! It works not only on startup, but this can be called after every make-frame. This is perfect for Parallels on OSX. I am so happy!!! –  lawlist Oct 23 '13 at 3:02

This is the simplest fix that worked for me:

(w32-send-sys-command #xf030)
(add-hook 'window-setup-hook (lambda () (tool-bar-mode -1)))
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, setting the variables directly in the _emacs didn't work for me, but setting them via window-setup-hook did. Thanks. –  J. Peterson May 6 '11 at 8:45

On X.org the system call is (since you asked originally for a cross-platform solution):

(defun x11-maximize-frame ()
  "Maximize the current frame (to full screen)"
  (interactive)
  (x-send-client-message nil 0 nil "_NET_WM_STATE" 32 '(2 "_NET_WM_STATE_MAXIMIZED_HORZ" 0))
  (x-send-client-message nil 0 nil "_NET_WM_STATE" 32 '(2 "_NET_WM_STATE_MAXIMIZED_VERT" 0)))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This works fine for me. (Using Xubuntu.) When I bind the command to a button, and press it repeatedly, the frame cycles between three states: normal, maximized, and some weird state where it's a bit taller than normal, but not as tall as possible. But that's a minor problem. –  Teemu Leisti Oct 16 '12 at 10:20

Dudes, what's wrong with

emacs -mm ?

This starts Emacs fully maximized. Put it in your shortcut, it really depends on the window manager you use ; I myself just alias it in my .*shrc.

On a different but not unrelated note, I in fact start Emacs in a way that if it's already started, the selected file is just opened as a new buffer in my existing Emacs session :

if [ "$(pidof emacs)" ] ; then
    emacsclient "$@"
else
    emacs -mm "$@"
fi

This I put in a ~/bin/e and I just launch Emacs with "e". I right-clicked a text file in the file manager, selected "open with another program" and entered "e", and now I just double click files and they all open neatly in the same session.

And everything is peachy and lispy :)

share|improve this answer
1  
This is by far the easiest option in my opinion. –  sma Jul 19 '12 at 15:51

First, thanks for the tip on the bug with (tool-bar-mode -1); saved me a lot of trouble! I'd rather keep everything within the .emacs file (no registry mods for me), so if you turn on the toolbar before maximizing, and then turn it off again, you'll can maximize nicely:

(defun maximize-current-frame () "Resizes the current frame to fill the screen"
    (interactive)
    ;; There is a bug in tool-bar-mode that prevents it from being
    ;; maximized, so turn it on before maximizing.
    ;; See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/815239/how-to-maximize-emacs-on-windows-at-startup)
    (tool-bar-mode 1)
    (w32-send-sys-command 61488)
    (tool-bar-mode -1)
)
share|improve this answer

Hey - nice function! Thanks for posting

I think it may not be working for you because you have code that looks like the following somewhere else in your init file. The default-frame-alist is being applied after the frame is created. I removed the size and position elements and you function works great on bootup of emacs.

   (setq default-frame-alist
     (list
      (cons 'left                 350)
      (cons 'top                  0)
      (cons 'width                80)
      (cons 'height               45)
     ......
share|improve this answer

If you really want to run Emacs full screen without window chrome (title bar and max/min/close button), then try the mode below. This worked for me with Emacs 23.3.1 on XP SP3.

http://www.martyn.se/code/emacs/darkroom-mode/

share|improve this answer

every one. emacs 23.3.1,blow code is invalid. because (menu-bar-mode -1) can cause windows not full-screen too.

(w32-send-sys-command #xf030)
(add-hook 'window-setup-hook (lambda () (tool-bar-mode -1)))

I search Eamcs wiki,find a useable method.

http://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/FullScreen#toc3

MS Windows

If you’re using MS Windows, and want to use “real fullscreen”, i.e, getting rid of the top titlebar and all, see w32-fullscreen at the site for darkroom-mode

Alternatively, a patch is available here that makes the fullscreen frame parameter really fullscreen on Windows.

To get a maximized window you can use: (w32-send-sys-command #xf030)

Attention! If you want that emacs starts maximized, you have to put this code into your .emacs file:

(defun jbr-init ()
  "Called from term-setup-hook after the default
terminal setup is
done or directly from startup if term-setup-hook not
used.  The value
0xF030 is the command for maximizing a window."
  (interactive)
  (w32-send-sys-command #xf030)
  (ecb-redraw-layout)
  (calendar)
)
(setq term-setup-hook 'jbr-init)
(setq window-setup-hook 'jbr-init)
share|improve this answer
    
hi~ I find the final problem solved method.full-screen error, is concern with boot-time delay. you can add follow code in you full-screen fuction, for example: (w32-send-sys-command 61488) (sleep-for 0.2) ;;delay 2 second ,it work in emacs 23.3.1, ok! –  zw963 May 12 '11 at 5:26
    
Another more elegant way: (run-with-idle-timer 0 nil 'maximize-frame), when run maximize-frame function, it will idle 0 second, this will make you frame can maximize correctly –  zw963 Oct 16 at 1:51

Another way to resolve such problem is put delay between

(menu-bar-mode -1)
(tool-bar-mode -1)
(tooltip-mode -1)
(scroll-bar-mode 1)

and set-frame-* functions. For example:

 (tool-bar-mode -1)
 (when window-system
  (run-at-time (format "%d sec" 1) nil '(lambda () (set-frame-position (selected-frame) 1 1)))
  (run-at-time (format "%d sec" 2) nil '(lambda () (set-frame-width (selected-frame) 150 t)))
  (run-at-time (format "%d sec" 3) nil '(lambda () (set-frame-height (selected-frame) 60 t)))
  )

It is essential to put delay between set-frame-* functions also!

share|improve this answer
(defun resize-frame ()
"Set size"
(interactive)
(set-frame-width (selected-frame) 110)
(set-frame-height (selected-frame) 33)
(set-frame-position (selected-frame) 0 1))

following is the last function called in my .emacs files it sets the height and width of the screen it does work on both emacs 22 and emacs 23 on debian and mac os x. set the height and width numbers according to your screen.

share|improve this answer

To disable the toolbar, add the line

(tool-bar-mode nil)

to your customization file (usually .emacs in your root directory).

share|improve this answer
    
I think you misunderstood my question. (tool-bar-mode nil) and (tool-bar-mode -1) does the same thing, and (tool-bar-mode -1) is exactly what I have in my .emacs file AND it is the cause of Emacs not correctly maximizing. –  polyglot May 4 '09 at 21:34

emacs-full-screen-win32 project will help you :)

share|improve this answer

The following snippet from emacswiki worked fine from me: (add to your startup config file)

(defun jbr-init ()
"Called from term-setup-hook after the default
terminal setup is
done or directly from startup if term-setup-hook not
used.  The value
0xF030 is the command for maximizing a window."
  (interactive)
  (w32-send-sys-command #xf030)
  (ecb-redraw-layout)
  (calendar)
  )
(setq term-setup-hook 'jbr-init)
(setq window-setup-hook 'jbr-init)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.