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I would like to be able to store various static methods in a List and later look them up and dynamically call them.

Each of the static methods has different numbers of args, types and return values

static int X(int,int)....
static string Y(int,int,string) 

I'd like to have a List that I can add them all to:

List<dynamic> list

list.Add(X);
list.Add(Y);

and later:

dynamic result = list[0](1,2);
dynamic result2 = list[1](5,10,"hello")

How to do this in C# 4?

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2  
+1, a different type of question. – Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Nov 16 '11 at 13:28
    
+1, I like that one – Dennis Nov 16 '11 at 13:32
1  
What you're looking for is the command pattern. Google that along with c# and you should be set. – Brian Roach Nov 16 '11 at 13:35
up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can create a list of delegate-instances, using an appropriate delegate-type for each method.

var list = new List<dynamic>
          {
               new Func<int, int, int> (X),
               new Func<int, int, string, string> (Y)
          };

dynamic result = list[0](1, 2); // like X(1, 2)
dynamic result2 = list[1](5, 10, "hello") // like Y(5, 10, "hello")
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, for a better answer. – Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Nov 16 '11 at 13:37
    
thanks, this technique worked perfectly! – freddy smith Nov 16 '11 at 13:44

You actually don't need the power of dynamic here, you can do with simple List<object>:

class Program
{
    static int f(int x) { return x + 1; }
    static void g(int x, int y) { Console.WriteLine("hallo"); }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<object> l = new List<object>();
        l.Add((Func<int, int>)f);
        l.Add((Action<int, int>)g);
        int r = ((Func<int, int>)l[0])(5);
        ((Action<int, int>)l[1])(0, 0);
    }
}

(well, you need a cast, but you need to somehow know the signature of each of the stored methods anyway)

share|improve this answer
    List<dynamic> list = new List<dynamic>();
        Action<int, int> myFunc = (int x, int y) => Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", x, y);
        Action<int, int> myFunc2 = (int x, int y) => Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", x, y);
        list.Add(myFunc);
        list.Add(myFunc2);

        (list[0])(5, 6);
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