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I'd like to transform a table in such a way that for duplicated values in column #2 it would have corresponding values from column #1.

I.e. something like that...

MZ00024296  AC148152.3_FG005

MZ00047079  AC148152.3_FG006

MZ00028122  AC148152.3_FG008

MZ00032922  AC148152.3_FG008

MZ00048218  AC148152.3_FG008

MZ00024680  AC148167.6_FG001

MZ00013456  AC149475.2_FG003

to

AC148152.3_FG005    MZ00024296

AC148152.3_FG006    MZ00047079

AC148152.3_FG008    MZ00028122|MZ00032922|MZ00048218

AC148167.6_FG001 MZ00024680

AC149475.2_FG003 MZ00013456

As I need it to computations in R I tried to use:

x=aggregate(mz_grmz,by=list(mz_grmz[,2]),FUN=paste(mz_grmz[,1],sep="|"))

but it don't work (wrong function) Error in match.fun(FUN) : 'paste(mz_grmz[, 1], sep = "|")' is not a function, character or symbol

I also remind myself about unstack() function, but it isn't what I need.

I tried to do it using awk, based on my base knowledge I reworked code given here:

site1

#! /bin/sh
for y do
awk -v FS="\t" '{
for (x=1;x<=NR;x++) {
    if (NR>2 && x=x+1) {
    print $2"\t"x
    }
    else {print NR}
}
}' $y > $y.2
done

unfortunately it doesn't work, it's only produce enormous file with field #2 and some numbers.

I suppose it is easy task, but it is above my skills right now. Could somebody give me a hint? Maybe just function to use in aggregate in R.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do it in awk like this:

awk '
    {
        if ($2 in a)
            a[$2] = a[$2] "|" $1
        else
            a[$2] = $1
    }
    END {
        for (i in a)
            print i, a[i]
    }' INFILE > OUTFILE
share|improve this answer
    
the empty lines could have problems in output. I didn't test, but I can see, there should be "|||..." in output. btw, your reputation number is nice:) 4444 –  Kent Nov 16 '11 at 15:03
    
@Kent I assumed the empty lines were a copy-paste artifact. If not, this can be easily remedied by adding NF before the first {. –  schot Nov 16 '11 at 15:10

to keep the output as same as the text in your question (empty lines etc..):

awk '{if($0 &&($2 in a))a[$2]=a[$2]"|"$1;else if ($0) a[$2]=$1;}\
END{for(x in a){print x,a[x];print ""}}' inputFile

test:

kent$  echo "MZ00024296  AC148152.3_FG005

MZ00047079  AC148152.3_FG006

MZ00028122  AC148152.3_FG008

MZ00032922  AC148152.3_FG008

MZ00048218  AC148152.3_FG008

MZ00024680  AC148167.6_FG001

MZ00013456  AC149475.2_FG003"|awk '{if($0 &&($2 in a))a[$2]=a[$2]"|"$1;else if ($0) a[$2]=$1;}END{for(x in a){print x,a[x];print ""}}'
AC149475.2_FG003 MZ00013456

AC148152.3_FG005 MZ00024296

AC148152.3_FG006 MZ00047079

AC148152.3_FG008 MZ00028122|MZ00032922|MZ00048218

AC148167.6_FG001 MZ00024680
share|improve this answer
    
schot, Kent, thanks for both of you. It works :-). Empty lines are indeed an artifact. If they not I'd remove it before the main script, using sed '/^$/d'. –  Maciej Jończyk Nov 16 '11 at 16:16

This GNU sed solution might work for you:

 sed -r '1{h;d};H;${x;s/(\S+)\s+(\S+)/\2\t\1/g;:a;s/(\S+\t)([^\n]*)(\n+)\1([^\n]*)\n*/\1\2|\4\3/;ta;p};d' input_file

Explanation: Use the extended regex option-r to make regex's more readable. Read the whole file into the hold space (HS). Then on end-of-file, switch to the HS and firstly swap and tab separate fields. Then compare the first fields in adjacent lines and if they match, tag the second field from the second record to the first line separated by a |. Repeated until no further adjacent lines have duplicate first fields then print the file out.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks potong for reply. Your code either don't work or my computer (2 x 1.5 GHz, 2Gb RAM) is too weak for it. I've submitted it, my system monitor shows that code is running but after ca. 30 min. nothing changes, so I killed the process. Anyway - thanks for your time. –  Maciej Jończyk Nov 17 '11 at 23:15
    
I've checked on smaller file and it works!. It's just much slower than awk code. –  Maciej Jończyk Nov 17 '11 at 23:26

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