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What's the pythonic way to designate unreachable code in python as in:

gender = readFromDB(...) # either 'm' or 'f'
if gender == 'm':
    greeting = 'Mr.'
elif gender == 'f':
    greeting = 'Ms.'
else:
    # What should this line say?
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5  
Perhaps it should say "Pat"? –  Chris Upchurch May 2 '09 at 18:22
    
I don't think unreachable code is the correct term for this. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unreachable_code –  Unknown May 3 '09 at 0:03
    
@unknown What would you suggest instead? I know this example is not that good, as the else loop is de-facto reachable. But as it happens, that's exactly the "measure of reachability" I'm looking for. –  phihag May 3 '09 at 11:35
    
I'd call this "unexpected data values in an if/else statement" rather than "unreachable code". –  stevegt Apr 6 '12 at 3:17

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted
raise ValueError('invalid gender %r' % gender)
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1  
From the pythonic manifesto... "...Errors should never pass silently. Unless explicitly silenced." –  jottos May 2 '09 at 19:01

This depends on how sure you are of the gender being either 'm' or 'f'.

If you're absolutely certain, use if...else instead of if...elif...else. Just makes it easier for everyone.

If there's any chance of malformed data, however, you should probably raise an exception to make testing and bug-fixing easier. You could use a gender-neutral greeting in this case, but for anything bigger, special values just make bugs harder to find.

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/Which/ exception type would you suggest? And everyone seems to get caught up in the example ;). –  phihag May 2 '09 at 18:38
1  
Probably ValueError as suggested by others. It seems to make the most sense: docs.python.org/library/exceptions.html –  zenazn May 2 '09 at 19:11
1  
There is always a chance for malformed data. –  Ethan Furman Apr 7 '12 at 2:09

You could raise an exception:

raise ValueError("Unexpected gender; expected 'm' or 'f', got %s" % gender)

or use an assert False if you expect the database to return only 'm' or 'f':

assert False, "Unexpected gender; expected 'm' or 'f', got %s" % gender
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1  
I think you mean 'assert False' :) –  Stephan202 May 2 '09 at 18:27
    
meh, fixed thanks :) –  marcog May 2 '09 at 18:27

I actually think that there's a place for this.

class SeriousDesignError( Exception ):
    pass

So you can do this

if number % 2 == 0:
    result = "Even"
elif number % 2 == 1:
    result = "Odd"
else:
    raise SeriousDesignError()

I think this is the most meaningful error message. This kind of thing can only arise through design errors (or bad maintenance, which is the same thing.)

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I would still include a descriptive string when raising SDE, like raise SeriousDesignError('Numbers must be either even or odd') –  gomad Oct 21 '11 at 21:24

It depends exactly what you want the error to signal, but I would use a dictionary in this case:

greetings={'m':'Mr.', 'f':'Ms.'}
gender = readFromDB(...) # either 'm' or 'f'
greeting=greetings[gender]

If gender is neither m nor f, this will raise a KeyError containing the unexpected value:

greetings={'m':'Mr.', 'f':'Ms.'}

>>> greetings['W']

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#4>", line 1, in <module>
    greetings['W']
KeyError: 'W'

If you want more detail in the message, you can catch & reraise it:

try:
  greeting = greetings[gender]
except KeyError,e:
  raise ValueError('Unrecognized gender %s'%gender)
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Until now, I've usually used a variation on John Fouhy's answer -- but this is not exactly correct, as Ethan points out:

assert gender in ('m', 'f')
if gender == 'm':
    greeting = 'Mr.'
else:
    greeting = 'Ms.'

The main problem with using an assert is that if anyone runs your code with the -O or -OO flags, the asserts get optimized away. As Ethan points out below, that means you now have no data checks at all. Asserts are a development aid and shouldn't be used for production logic. I'm going to get into the habit of using a check() function instead -- this allows for clean calling syntax like an assert:

def check(condition, msg=None):
    if not condition:
        raise ValueError(msg or '')

check(gender in ('m', 'f'))
if gender == 'm':
    greeting = 'Mr.'
else:
    greeting = 'Ms.'

Going back to the original question, I'd claim that using an assert() or check() prior to the if/else logic is easier to read, safer, and more explicit:

  • it tests the data quality first before starting to act on it -- this might be important if there are operators other than '==' in the if/else chain
  • it separates the assertion test from the branching logic, rather than interleaving them -- this makes reading and refactoring easier
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If you want to pre-verify you should do it with if gender not in ('m','f'): raise SomeException as asserts can be optimized out and then you have no verification at all. –  Ethan Furman Apr 7 '12 at 2:09
    
Arg. That's right. I never use -O or -OO so I don't worry about it for my own code, but I agree it's a bad habit. I'll fix the answer. –  stevegt Apr 8 '12 at 17:13

I sometimes do:

if gender == 'm':
    greeting = 'Mr.'
else:
    assert gender == 'f'
    greeting = 'Ms.'

I think this does a good job of telling a reader of the code that there are only (in this case) two possibilities, and what they are. Although you could make a case for raising a more descriptive error than AssertionError.

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