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I have this function in my custom dynamic array class that allows the user to insert another array into this one. It works, but I'm like 99% sure that this is not the fastest solution, and I'm wondering if it is possible to combine the two for loops to increase peformance? If so, how? I'm kinda stuck.

thanks in advance.

void insertrange(T item[], int sizerange, int index) 
    {
        int k = this->size;
        int j = 0;
        if(this->size + sizerange >= this->capacity) //if the size + added size are bigger than the capacity
        {
            this->enlarge(this->capacity + sizerange); //enlarge the array
        }
        for(k; k >= index; k--) //for every element from the end to the index where to add the new array
        {
            this->array[k + sizerange] = a[k]; //replace the element to his new spot
        }
        for(j; j < sizerange; j++) //vor every element in the new array
        {
            this->array[index + j] = item[j]; //place it in the new spot
        }
        size += sizerange; 
    }
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2  
Measure performance before you try to optimize. If you have, where is the bottleneck? –  aschepler Nov 16 '11 at 14:36
1  
Have you proven that this is a real bottleneck in your application by profiling the release build? –  John Dibling Nov 16 '11 at 14:36
    
I'm assuming this is homework - otherwise you'd just use a std::vector! –  Nick Nov 16 '11 at 14:37
    
it's not a real bottleneck and neither it's homework. im trying to make an array that is faster than the std::vector so im trying to squeeze every little bit of preformance i can :) –  Marnix v. R. Nov 16 '11 at 14:43
1  
You might find that std::copy and std::reverse_copy are faster than for loops, if T is a POD type and your library has an assembly-optimised implementation. You'll have to measure it to be sure. (It might be a good idea anyway, both for readability, and to reduce the chance of introducing off-by-one errors like the one in your first loop). –  Mike Seymour Nov 16 '11 at 14:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the key is that you don't have to copy the empty cells.

   void insertrange(T item[], int sizerange, int index) 
    {
        // This actually points past the end of the current array, right?
        int onePastLastEntry = this->size;
        // Still need to make sure the new array is large enough
        if(this->size + sizerange >= this->capacity) //if the size + added size are bigger than the capacity
        {
            this->enlarge(this->capacity + sizerange); //enlarge the array
        }
        // you should be able to go forward instead of backwards
        for(i = index; i < onePastLastEntry ; i++)
        {
            // move the current element
            this->array[i + sizerange] = a[i];
            // then copy the new value
            this->array[i] = item[i - index];
        }

You could actually do the loop from zero, going to onePastLastEntry - index as well, but that makes the math weird:

        // you should be able to go forward instead of backwards
        for(i = 0; i < onePastLastEntry - index; i++)
        {
            // now you have to add the index in two places here
            this->array[i + index + sizerange] = a[i + index];
            // and add the index in the copy as well
            this->array[i + index] = item[i];
        }
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The only possible performance benefit I see is doing less dynamic allocation every time the array gets larger. It is better in most cases to multiply the capacity by 2 every time you need to reallocate.

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I would guess that that's handled under the covers by the enlarge function. If it's not, it should be. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 16 '11 at 14:38
    
i see, i see. thanks :) i thought it would be faster to combine the 2 loops somehow. thanks for the answers –  Marnix v. R. Nov 16 '11 at 14:44

You have one extra copy in your k for loop. The k index should start at size-1, not size, so you are copying one extra element beyond the end of your array. However, this will provide negligible speedup. If serious performance improvement is needed, you should look into optimizing the enlarge function or use a different data structure than an array.

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You can move the elements, instead of copying them:

for(k; k >= index; k--)
{
    this->array[k + sizerange] = std::move(a[k]);
}

Another possible improvement, especially for classes that have an expensive default constructor, is to construct T in place, using the move constructor. When you allocate, instead of allocating with new T[], which default constructs every element, allocate raw bytes with new char[] or malloc. Then you can use placement new to move construct the object on the spot.

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