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I have

    template <typename ConcContainer>
    class WebBrowsingPolicyData
    {
    public:
        typedef ConcContainer<std::shared_ptr<WBRuleDetails>>::iterator iterator;
    ...
    private:
    ConcContainer<std::shared_ptr<WBRuleDetails>> usersData_;
    CRITICAL_SECTION critSection

I get a compile error at line (Error 6 error C2238: unexpected token(s) preceding ';')

typedef ConcContainer<std::shared_ptr<WBRuleDetails>>::iterator iterator

How can I make a typedef inside the template ? I must be missing something..

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This looks confusing: Is ConcContainer a typename or a template? –  aschepler Nov 16 '11 at 14:49
    
ConcContainer is actually a template that's why hmjd answer is valid –  Ghita Nov 17 '11 at 6:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ConContainer is itself a template so it needs to be a template template parameter:

template <template <typename T> class ConcContainer>
class WebBrowsingPolicyData
{
public:
    typedef typename ConcContainer<std::shared_ptr<WBRuleDetails>>::iterator iterator;
};
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I think you are right. –  Ghita Nov 16 '11 at 18:04

Two possibilities:

  1. The compiler is having trouble with >>. Insert a space. Note that if you're using a C++11-conformant compiler, this should not be an issue.

example:

typedef ConcContainer<std::shared_ptr<WBRuleDetails> >::iterator iterator;
  1. ConcContainer doesn't have a member or typedef iterator. Check to make sure that it really does.

EDIT: This is not the most vexing parse.

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I have conformant compiler VC 2010. I am not instantiating there the WebBrowsingPolicy...So must be something else. –  Ghita Nov 16 '11 at 14:51
    
Pretty sure that's not the most vexing parse: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Most_vexing_parse –  obmarg Nov 16 '11 at 14:51
    
@obmarg: Well, whadya know! You're right -- I've always thought of this incorrectly. Edited. –  John Dibling Nov 16 '11 at 14:57

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