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For comparing strings, the use is usually lt,gt etc..

what exactly perl does when I compare strings using numerical operators? (<, >)

my $str1 = 'Joe';
my $str2 = 'flight';

I guess that when doing $str1 gt $str2 perl compares the ASCII codes(?), but what happens when I do the following:

$str1 > $str2

thanks

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You get the equivalent of '0 > 0'. Add 'use warnings;' to your code, and you'll also get a warning. –  runrig Nov 16 '11 at 17:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To Perl, 10 is 10 whether it's stored as a string (PV), a signed int (IV), an unsigned int (UV) or a floating point number (NV).

<, > and == compare the numerical values of their operands. Then numerical value of stuff that isn't a number is zero*, so the numerical value of flight is zero (with a warning) and the numerical value of Joe is zero (with a warning), so they are equal.

On the other hand, the numerical value of string 10 is 10, and the numerical value of string 2 is 2, so

10 >= 2       # True
'10' >= '2'   # True

10 ge 2       # False (ord('1') is less than ord('2'))
'10' ge '2'   # False

* — Objects can override this, and the numerical value of a reference is the address of the referenced value.

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First of all you got a warning :

Argument "flight" isn't numeric in numeric lt (<) at 
Argument "Joe" isn't numeric in numeric lt (<) at

Then perl cast these strings to integer so they become 0 then the comparison is done.

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4  
Well, you should get a warning. For some reason use strict; use warnings; is still escaping some people's boilerplate. –  Quentin Nov 16 '11 at 15:34
    
Its not, I'm using these pair always, was just wondering what happens behind the scenes. –  snoofkin Nov 16 '11 at 15:49
what exactly perl does when I compare strings using numerical operators? (<, >)

perl converts the strings to numbers before comparing them.

Both of your example strings convert to zero.

but what happens when I do the following:
$str1 > $str2

They are compared according to the "collating sequence" (nominally alphabetical), as if the strings were sorted as in a phonebook.

'barney' < 'bammbam'

is false:

compare 1st letters - tied
compare 2nd letters - tied
compare 3rd letters - "m" comes before "r", so the comparison is false.
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No, it simply compares the codepoints of the characters. If you want phonebook order, you need to use use locale; –  ikegami Nov 16 '11 at 17:54
1  
'barney' < 'bammbam' is a numeric comparison. I think you meant 'barney' lt 'bammbam'. –  cjm Nov 16 '11 at 18:19

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