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I am working on preparing some dynamic html with jquery and json object. but the problem is that when my json object has around 1500 rows it takes ages to load.

is there a way to load the thing faster.

Some code.

     $(jQuery.each(jsonObject.AvailableColumns, function (i, l) {
                if (type == "manual") {
                    innerList1 += '<li newText="" valueFormat="' + l.ValueFormat + '" scaleID="' + l.ScaleID + '" scaleType="' + l.ScaleType + '" hasWeights="' + l.HasWeights + '" customColumnType="' + l.CustomColumnType + '" class="" id="li_' + controlId + '"><span id="span_' + controlId + '" title = "' + l.QuestionText + '">' + getDisplayString(l.QuestionText) + '</span><a class="actionLeft"></a></li>';
                }
                else if (type = "exportall") {
                    innerList2 += CreateLiWithSpans('li_' + controlId, l.QuestionText, true, false, l.ScaleID, l.ScaleType, l.HasWeights, l.CustomColumnType, l.ValueFormat);
                }
                controlId++;
            }));
    $("#itemList").html(innerlist1);

EDIT : createliwithspan method

function CreateLiWithSpans(id, html, isLeft, isAddAll, scaleID, scaleType, hasWeights, customColumnType, valueFormat, newText) {
    var ancClass = isLeft ? 'actionRight' : 'actionLeft';
    var liObject = "";

    if (newText == null) {
        newText = "";
    }
    if (isLeft) {
        liObject = '<li newtext="' + newText + '" valueFormat="' + valueFormat + '" scaleID="' + scaleID + '" scaleType="' + scaleType + '" hasWeights="' + hasWeights + '" customColumnType="' + customColumnType + '" class="" id="' + id + '"><span id="span_' + id + '" title = "' + html + '">' + getDisplayString(html) + '</span><span style="margin:0 10px 0 20px;pagging:0"><input title = "' + (newText == "" ? html : newText) + '" type="text" id="' + id + 'displayText" value="' + (newText == "" ? html : newText) + '"  /><span style="color:Red; width:100%;" id="' + id + 'displayTextError"></span></span><span style="float:left">' + CreateDropDown('ddl_' + id, valueFormat, hasWeights) + '</span><a class="' + ancClass + '"></a></li>';
    }
    else {
        liObject = '<li newtext="' + newText + '" valueFormat="' + valueFormat + '" scaleID="' + scaleID + '" scaleType="' + scaleType + '" hasWeights="' + hasWeights + '" customColumnType="' + customColumnType + '" class="" id="' + id + '"><span id="span_' + id + '" title = "' + html + '">' + getDisplayString(html) + '</span><a class="' + ancClass + '"></a></li>';
    }
    return liObject;
}
share|improve this question
    
What does CreateLiWithSpans look like? –  Blazemonger Nov 16 '11 at 15:25
    
May want to do some dynamic paging. Retrieve 50 rows and page the rest. Or load more when the user scrolls to the bottom. 1500 is a lot of visual data to render on any front end client (Web or Native) –  Brandon Boone Nov 16 '11 at 15:28
    
@boone thats the last thing i can do but currently i need an hot fix for this. any other way out –  ankur Nov 16 '11 at 15:30

4 Answers 4

You can use for loop instead of jQuery.each, that will be faster. Store the itemCount before the loop, and use that:

itemCount = jsonData.items.length;
for(var i = 0; i < itemCount; i++ ) {
...

You can also use use an array instead of string concatenation, like so:

var innerList = [];
... // inside the loop
innerList.push(CreateLiWithSpans('li_' + controlId, l.QuestionText, true, false, l.ScaleID, l.ScaleType, l.HasWeights, l.CustomColumnType, l.ValueFormat));
... // after the loop
$("#itemList").html(innerList.join(''));

This will be faster in IE, I'm not sure about other js engines.

These two methods will not make a significant difference, so you should try implementing a client side pagination from json. (Not by hiding and showing divs, by rendering only visible page into the DOM).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the extra advice with the array –  Richard Dalton Nov 16 '11 at 15:39

Instead of waiting for the loop to end to append your data, why not actively append the data as you process it. This will allow the user to get immediate feedback instead of waiting for the whole thing to process. Other than this, I'd stick with my original comment to page the data.

$(jQuery.each(jsonObject.AvailableColumns, function (i, l) {
                if (type == "manual") {
                    $("#itemList").append( '<li newText="" valueFormat="' + l.ValueFormat + '" scaleID="' + l.ScaleID + '" scaleType="' + l.ScaleType + '" hasWeights="' + l.HasWeights + '" customColumnType="' + l.CustomColumnType + '" class="" id="li_' + controlId + '"><span id="span_' + controlId + '" title = "' + l.QuestionText + '">' + getDisplayString(l.QuestionText) + '</span><a class="actionLeft"></a></li>');
                }
                else if (type = "exportall") {
                    $("#itemList2").append(CreateLiWithSpans('li_' + controlId, l.QuestionText, true, false, l.ScaleID, l.ScaleType, l.HasWeights, l.CustomColumnType, l.ValueFormat));
                }
                controlId++;
            }));
share|improve this answer
  1. Try replacing jQuery.each with a plain old for...in loop. Using jQuery.each adds overhead that you don't need.
  2. Don't concatenate strings inside your loop. Instead, .push them onto an array variable and use .join('') to build the string all at once at the end.
  3. You may need to eliminate CreateLiWithSpans as a separate function in order to fully implement (2).
share|improve this answer

Changing from using jQuery.each to a standard javascript for loop should speed it up a bit. Make sure that you save the length to a variable like this though:

for(var i = 0, len = jsonObject.AvailableColumns.length; i < len; i++){
    var l = jsonObject.AvailableColumns[i];
    // Continue with rest of code
}

Probably won't be a huge increase but every little helps.

Also try lowering the number of function calls you make as these have added overhead (not usually an issue, but in a large loop it can help). Unless the code is shared between functions try doing it inline and see how much that speeds it up.

share|improve this answer
    
i already tried that not much of a difference. –  ankur Nov 16 '11 at 15:39
    
Not much is still a bit :D Added a bit of extra advice regarding function calls. –  Richard Dalton Nov 16 '11 at 15:50
    
jsonObject.AvailableColumns.length this should be cached to see improvement, otherwise you are looking it up each time, unless the js engine does something smart for you. IE won't:) –  strada Nov 16 '11 at 16:06
    
It is being cached. That's why I am saving it to len in the first part of the for loop. –  Richard Dalton Nov 16 '11 at 16:09
    
@Richard D it was meant as a reply to ankur, because he should see a difference. Just trying to make sure he sees that you are caching the length. –  strada Nov 16 '11 at 18:39

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