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Example

    data SomeData = Number Integer | String String | Bool Bool
                  deriving Eq

And,I want to use 'div' with SomeData.

    instance Num SomeData where
            (Number x) + (Number y) = Number $ x + y -- It's Ok.
            (Number x) - (Number y) = Number $ x - y -- It's Ok.
            (Number x) * (Number y) = Number $ x * y -- It's ok.
    instance Integral SomeData Where
            (Number x) `div` (Number y) = Number $ x `div` y

But I got Error Message.

main.hs:105:10:
    No instance for (Real SomeData)
      arising from the superclasses of an instance declaration
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Real SomeData)
    In the instance declaration for `Integral SomeData'

main.hs:105:10:
    No instance for (Enum SomeData)
      arising from the superclasses of an instance declaration
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Enum SomeData)
    In the instance declaration for `Integral SomeData'

Ok,If I want to use div with SomeData data,should I write Real Instance and Enum Instance for SomeData step-by-step? Or Is there another good way ?

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Isn't the issue that div returns a Real and you don't have a type constructor in SomeData for Number Real? –  Paolo Nov 16 '11 at 16:16
    
@Paolo No. div :: Integral a -> a -> a -> a. –  FUZxxl Nov 16 '11 at 16:19
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2 Answers

Yes, you need to write instances for Real and Enum. You can cheat by doing

instance Real SomeData
instance Enum SomeData

Then you will get runtime failures if you use the methods in those classes. Or, for Real:

instance Real SomeData where
    toRational (Number i) = toRational i

(You have a lot of partial functions already, so I assume you don't mind some more.)

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A general method to solve problems like this is to use :info command in ghci:

Prelude> :i Integral
class (Real a, Enum a) => Integral a where
  quot :: a -> a -> a
  rem :: a -> a -> a
  div :: a -> a -> a
  mod :: a -> a -> a
  quotRem :: a -> a -> (a, a)
  divMod :: a -> a -> (a, a)
  toInteger :: a -> Integer

So no, you cannot implement Integral without implementing Real. You could have started straight from div:

Prelude> :i div
class (Real a, Enum a) => Integral a where
  ...
  div :: a -> a -> a
  ...
        -- Defined in GHC.Real
infixl 7 div

So you can see that div is a method of Integral type class and you need Real and Enum to be defined as well. If you check Real, it requires Num and Ord etc.

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