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I'm new to C# and object-oriented programming in general. I've been trying to implement a "Cancel" button into my GUI so that the user can stop it mid-process.

I read this question: How to implement a Stop/Cancel button? and determined that a backgroundWorker should be a good option for me, but the example given doesn't explain how to hand arguments to the backgroundWorker.

My problem is that I do not know how to pass an argument into backgroundWorker such that it will stop the process; I have only been able to get backgroundWorker to stop itself.

I created the following code to try to learn this, where my form has two buttons (buttonStart and buttonStop) and a backgroundWorker (backgroundWorkerStopCheck):

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Threading;
using System.Timers;

namespace TestBackgroundWorker
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {         
            InitializeComponent();

            // Set the background worker to allow the user to stop the process. 
            backgroundWorkerStopCheck.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
        }

        private System.Timers.Timer myTimer;

        private void backgroundWorkerStopCheck_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            //If cancellation is pending, cancel work.  
            if (backgroundWorkerStopCheck.CancellationPending)
            {
                e.Cancel = true;
                return;
            }
        }

        private void buttonStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            // Notify the backgroundWorker that the process is starting.
            backgroundWorkerStopCheck.RunWorkerAsync();
            LaunchCode();
        }

        private void buttonStop_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            // Tell the backgroundWorker to stop process.
            backgroundWorkerStopCheck.CancelAsync();
        }

        private void LaunchCode()
        {
            buttonStart.Enabled = false; // Disable the start button to show that the process is ongoing.
            myTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(5000); // Waste five seconds.
            myTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(myTimer_Elapsed);
            myTimer.Enabled = true; // Start the timer.
        }

        void myTimer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            buttonStart.Enabled = true; // ReEnable the Start button to show that the process either finished or was cancelled.
        }
    }
}

The code, if it worked properly, would just sit there for five seconds after the user clicked "Start" before re-enabling the Start button, or would quickly reactivate the Start button if the user clicked "Stop".

There are two problems with this code that I am not sure how to handle:

1) The "myTimer_Elapsed" method results in an InvalidOperationException when it attempts to enable the Start button, because the "cross-thread operation was not valid". How do I avoid cross-thread operations?

2) Right now the backgroundWorker doesn't accomplish anything because I don't know how to feed arguments to it such that, when it is canceled, it will stop the timer.

I'd appreciate any assistance!

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, the problem to avoid "cross-thread operation was not valid" is use Invoke on controls. You cannot use a control from a different thread.

About the second issue, I would implement it in the following way. This is a minimum background worker implementation with cancel support.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication5
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            // Set the background worker to allow the user to stop the process. 
            backgroundWorkerStopCheck.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
            backgroundWorkerStopCheck.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(backgroundWorkerStopCheck_DoWork);
        }

        private void backgroundWorkerStopCheck_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            try
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
                {
                    if (backgroundWorkerStopCheck.CancellationPending)
                    {
                        // user cancel request
                        e.Cancel = true;
                        return;
                    }

                    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                InvokeEnableStartButton();
            }
        }

        private void buttonStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //disable start button before launch work
            buttonStart.Enabled = false;

            // start worker
            backgroundWorkerStopCheck.RunWorkerAsync();
        }

        private void buttonStop_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            // Tell the backgroundWorker to stop process.
            backgroundWorkerStopCheck.CancelAsync();
        }

        private void InvokeEnableStartButton()
        {
            // this method is called from a thread,
            // we need to Invoke to avoid "cross thread exception"
            if (this.InvokeRequired)
            {
                this.Invoke(new EnableStartButtonDelegate(EnableStartButton));
            }
            else
            {
                EnableStartButton();
            }
        }

        private void EnableStartButton()
        {
            buttonStart.Enabled = true;
        }
    }

    internal delegate void EnableStartButtonDelegate();
}

About passing arguments to the worker, you can pass any object in the RunWorkerAsync() method, and its reveived in the backgroundWorkerStopCheck_DoWork method:

  ...
  backgroundWorkerStopCheck.RunWorkerAsync("hello");
  ...

  private void backgroundWorkerStopCheck_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
  {
      string argument = e.Argument as string;
      // argument value is "hello"
      ...
  }

Hope it helps.

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Thank you very much, Daniel. This was very informative! –  Patrigon Nov 16 '11 at 18:54
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try this example and you will see how to pass data to and from the BackgroundWorker:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        bw.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(bw_DoWork);
        bw.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(bw_RunWorkerCompleted);
        bw.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        btnStart.Enabled = false;
        btnCancel.Enabled = true;

        double[] data = new double[1000000];
        Random r = new Random();
        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
            data[i] = r.NextDouble();

        bw.RunWorkerAsync(data);
    }

    void bw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        btnStart.Enabled = true;
        btnCancel.Enabled = false;

        if (!e.Cancelled)
        {
            double result = (double)e.Result;
            MessageBox.Show(result.ToString());
        }
    }

    void bw_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        double[] data = (double[])e.Argument;

        for (int j = 0; j < 200; j++)
        {
            double result = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
            {
                if (bw.CancellationPending)
                {
                    e.Cancel = true;
                    return;
                }
                result += data[i];
            }
            e.Result = result;
        }
    }

    private void btnCancel_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        bw.CancelAsync();
        btnStart.Enabled = true;
        btnCancel.Enabled = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the nice implementation example. I'm not sure the button enable/disable statements are needed in the btnCancelClick handler. The buttons will be enabled/disabled in bw_runWorkerCompleted. If the statements are duplicated in btn_Cancel_Click, as shown in the present code, you would run the risk of enabling the Start button before the backgroud worker finished cancelling, which could be a problem if the operation running in the background worker takes a few seconds to cancel. –  B Pete Nov 16 '11 at 18:01
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