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How does one combine using $ and point-free style?

A clear example is the following utility function:

times :: Int -> [a] -> [a]
times n xs = concat $ replicate n xs  

Just writing concat $ replicate produces an error, similarly you can't write concat . replicate either because concat expects a value and not a function.

So how would you turn the above function into point-free style?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can use this combinator: (The colon hint that there follow two arguments)

(.:) :: (c -> d) -> (a -> b -> c) -> a -> b -> d
(.:) = (.) . (.)

It allows you to get rid of the n:

time = concat .: replicate
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3  
+1 It's a shame we can't call it (..). –  dave4420 Nov 16 '11 at 17:47
    
@dave4420 Well, IMHO .: is much more mnemnoric –  FUZxxl Nov 16 '11 at 18:02
2  
I personally prefer .*, so that the next ones can be .**, .***, etc. Either way, we should try to get .: into Haskell Prime's Prelude, or at least into base libraries. –  Dan Burton Nov 16 '11 at 21:25
    
Is fmap fmap fmap a generalization of .:? –  nponeccop Nov 17 '11 at 14:57
    
@nponeccop Yes, but one is like (.), so it's rather fmap . fmap. –  FUZxxl Nov 17 '11 at 17:11

Get on freenode and ask lambdabot ;)

<jleedev> @pl \n xs -> concat $ replicate n xs
<lambdabot> (join .) . replicate
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1  
That's always a good idea. –  FUZxxl Nov 16 '11 at 17:00
    
Note that (foo . ) . bar is lambdabot's typical pattern for foo .: bar, since .: is apparently not considered in the poitless-ing process. –  Dan Burton Nov 16 '11 at 21:34

You can easily write an almost point-free version with

times n  =  concat . replicate n

A fully point-free version can be achieved with explicit curry and uncurry:

times  =  curry $ concat . uncurry replicate
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IMHO the last one is unneccessarily complicated since it involves needless curry and uncurry, see the answer of Josh and me. –  FUZxxl Nov 16 '11 at 16:59
5  
+1 for the almost point-free version. –  dave4420 Nov 16 '11 at 17:46
3  
Another +1 for the almost point-free version. While I recommend wider adoption of .:, I also recommend sticking with "almost" point-free for more convoluted cases. –  Dan Burton Nov 16 '11 at 21:36
3  
@Dan Well, completely pointfree is often considered too pointless, at least by me. –  FUZxxl Nov 17 '11 at 17:13
1  
and by me :) Adapt the degree of point-free to your skills and taste. There are some fundamental flaws with point free style which can be observed by studying combinatory logic - the ultimate pointfree calculus. Also take a look at Tony Hoare's work on function-based programming. –  nponeccop Nov 17 '11 at 19:10

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