Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The solution to this one feels like it's on the tip of my tongue, but I can't quite figure out a way to do it. Consider the following HTML:

<span>This has some text.
    <span>This has some more text.</span>
    <span>And so on.</span>
    <span>And so forth, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera...</span>
</span>

Each span has a click listener:

$("span").click(function()
{
    $(this).css("color", "somecolor");
}

When the PARENT span has its css changed, is there a way to prevent the css change from propagating to the children elements? Or a way to only make the change affect the TEXT in the clicked span?

I know there are ways of reorganizing the html that would make it easier, but I'm dealing with very malformed html automatically generated by a legacy system I can't change.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In a word, no. This is the "cascading" part of CSS in action.

You'll have to add CSS specifically to undo the change done to those child elements. For instance:

$("span").click(function() {
    $(this).css("color", "blue")
        .children().css("color","black");
});

Depending on exactly what your HTML looks like, you may need to stop the click from propagating up to the outermost span as well:

$("span").click(function() {
    e.stopPropagation();
    $(this).css("color", "blue")
        .children().css("color","black");
});

A possibly less-complicated solution involves using !important to nail down the CSS styles of the sub-spans: http://jsfiddle.net/mblase75/ce2Av/2/ However, you'll need to specify all the sub-elements of that outer span in this manner, which may get complicated depending on your HTML.

If you want the children not to be all one color, but to remain whatever color they were beforehand, then things get tricky. You'd have to cache those values beforehand using an array and then reassign them one by one.

share|improve this answer
    
I ended up having to do just what you say in the last paragraph. I didn't want it to come to that, but it looks like there just isn't any other way. Thanks! –  Indigenuity Nov 16 '11 at 19:41

On click stop event propagation and add some class to span. In CSS create two rules - general for span and another for class. Child elements will not be affected on click.

Javascript

$("span").click(function(e){
    e.stopPropagation();
    $(this).addClass("special");
});

CSS

span{
    color:#DDD;
}
.special{
    color:#0077cc;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.