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The following code creates a 10 x 15 grid of 40 pixel squares. I would like to be able to group the squares into rows for animating later. Specifically, I want to animate the rows dropping to the bottom and then apply animated matrix transforms to them. Eventually they will just replicate the same grid at a new location.

 <script type="text/javascript">

    var squares = [];
    var paperHeight = 600;
    var paperWidth = 400;
    var squareSize = 40;

    var cols = paperWidth / squareSize;
    var rows = paperHeight / squareSize;

    var paper = Raphael($("#grid-test")[0],paperWidth,paperHeight);
        for (var i = 0; i < cols; i++) {
            // Begin loop for rows
            for (var j = 0; j < rows; j++) {

              // Scaling up to draw a rectangle at (x,y)
              var x = i * squareSize;
              var y = j * squareSize;

              // For every column and row, a square is drawn at an (x,y) location 
              paper.rect(x,y,squareSize,squareSize); 
            }
        }

</script>
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2 Answers 2

You can keep track of the elements with a 2 dimensional array [row][column]. Then iterate over each column in a row to get the appropriate elements; then just animate them. Note that you need to swap i/j when bullding; currently you're building [column][row].

http://jsfiddle.net/7ncHM/

var rowsArr = [];

for (var i = 0; i < cols; i++) {
    // Begin loop for rows
    rowsArr[i] = [];

    for (var j = 0; j < rows; j++) {

      // Scaling up to draw a rectangle at (x,y)
      var x = j * squareSize; // swap i/j
      var y = i * squareSize;

      // For every column and row, a square is drawn at an (x,y) location 
      rowsArr[i][j] = paper.rect(x,y,squareSize,squareSize);
      // draw and store directly, isn't that elegant? :)
    }
}

function animateRow(i) {
    var row = rowsArr[i];
    for(var j = 0; j < row.length; j++) { // iterate elements in row
        row[j].animate({y: 400}, 2000);
    }
}

animateRow(2);
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+1 Beat me to the example! (JsFiddle dying when I drag the Raph library in!) –  El Ronnoco Nov 16 '11 at 17:21
    
@El Ronnoco: jsFiddle is indeed really slow at times :( –  pimvdb Nov 16 '11 at 17:23
    
Thanks - this looks awesome. Any idea why this code loses 5 rows? There were 15 rows in my original grid and ideally this will be a 6 x 4 ratio grid. –  codecowboy Nov 16 '11 at 17:51
    
Thanks - this looks awesome. Any idea why this code loses 5 rows? –  codecowboy Nov 16 '11 at 17:52
1  
cancel that - the cols and rows vars also needed swapping round for the nested loops –  codecowboy Nov 16 '11 at 17:53

You'll have difficulty animating individual rows if you don't store a reference to the squares which make up a row (presumably this is what the unused squares[] array is for...)

Each time you call paper.rect assign the result to an element in squares[]

You could then have an function which takes a given row of your array and applies Raphael's .animate to each square - giving the impression of the whole row being animated.

http://raphaeljs.com/reference.html#Element.animate

In response to your comment - you can add elements to a Raphael set and then animate the set -eg...

var squares = [];
var paperHeight = 600;
var paperWidth = 400;
var squareSize = 40;

var cols = paperWidth / squareSize;
var rows = paperHeight / squareSize;

var paper = Raphael($("#grid-test")[0],paperWidth,paperHeight);

var rowSets = [];

// *** GRID CONSTRUCTION CODE STARTS ***///
// I have swapped the usage of i and j within the loop so that cells
// in a row are drawn consecutively. 
// Previously, it was column cells which were drawn
// consecutively
for (var i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
    //create a new set which will hold this row
    rowSets[i] = paper.set();
    squares[i] = [];

    // Begin loop for cells in row
    for (var j = 0; j < cols; j++) {

      // Scaling up to draw a rectangle at (x,y)
      var x = j * squareSize;
      var y = i * squareSize;

      // For every column and row, a square is drawn at an (x,y) location 
      var newRect = paper.rect(x,y,squareSize,squareSize); 
      // add the new cell to the row
      rowSets[i].push(newRect);
      squares[i][j] = newRect;
    }
}
// *** GRID CONSTRUCTION CODE ENDS ***

squares[5][5].attr({fill : '#f00'});            // colour an individual cell
rowSets[6].attr({fill : '#00f'});               // colour an entire row                 
rowSets[6].animate({y : 10 * squareSize},400);  // animate an enitre row

This means you could build a set of rows (and of columns) and animate them as individual units.

UPDATE

As a Raphael set is just a way of associating elements together to provide an easy way to apply operations en masse. It does not work in the same way as "Group" in Visio for example - ie They are still individual elements and will be animated independently.

Raphael will not find the centre of the set to do a rotation around. Each element of the set will be rotated around its own centre.

This problem can be solved by using a path to define an entire row at once as an SVG path. However this means that rows are now "one entity" and you will have difficulty addressing one cell, or one column. However you could switch the indiviual cells for a "row path" before performing the transform. The user/player hopefully wouldn't notice.

You can replace the // *** GRID CONSTRUCTION *** code with the following code to build rows as paths... (JSFiddle Demo)

//Build a row path - this path will be used as the basis of all the rows
var sPath = "lpw 0 l0 sq l-pw 0 l0 -sq " //outline of the whole row
for (var cell = 1; cell < cols; cell++){
    sPath += "msq 0 l0 sq Z ";           //insert an "upright" cell separator
};    
sPath = sPath.replace(/sq/g,squareSize).replace(/pw/g,paperWidth);

//we have no 'for' loop for columns now as we are creating entire row .paths
for (var j = 0; j < rows; j++) {

    //we apply the 'M' (Move) offset here to the beginning of the path
    //This is simply to adjust the Y-offset of the start of the path
    //ie to put the the path in a new row position
    rowSets[j] = paper.path("M0 " + j * squareSize + sPath); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Could raphael sets also be used to do this? –  codecowboy Nov 16 '11 at 17:53
    
Please see update... –  El Ronnoco Nov 17 '11 at 9:34
    
Thanks! If I do this - jsfiddle.net/codecowboy/XTsbW/8 - then each square is transformed individually, not the whole row? –  codecowboy Nov 17 '11 at 15:51
    
@codecowboy Yes, that's because a Raphael set is just an easy way of applying the same method to a group of elements. So each element will be transformed independently. This does not matter if you are only performing lateral shifting. For rotation / zooming etc you may need to apply a specific transform to each cell individually. Or you could achieve the effect I think you want with paths –  El Ronnoco Nov 17 '11 at 16:53
    
@codecowboy Please see my update :) –  El Ronnoco Nov 18 '11 at 10:00

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