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I am having difficulty trying to code these functions. They are not working properly and do not know what I am doing wrong. As for Transitive, I cannot even get started and would like any help you can give on it and what I am doing wrong in my functions. Thank you.
Sample inputs:

0 1 2 3 //elements (A)
0 0     //relations (B)
1 1
2 2
3 3

x y z //elements (A)
x y   //relations (B)
y z
y y
z z

x y z //elements (A)
x x   //relations (B)
y z
x y
z y
x z
y y
z x
y x
z z

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 //elements (A)
1 4             //relations (B)
1 7
2 5
2 8
3 6
4 7
5 8
6 6
1 1
2 2

Code:

bool reflexive(int a[], int sizeOfA, int b[], int sizeOfB) 
{
  bool hold = true;
  for(int i=0; i+1<sizeOfB; i+=2) 
  {
    int e = b[i];
    int e1 = b[i];
    if(pair_is_in_relation(e1, e, b, sizeOfB) == false) 
    {
        if (hold) 
    {
            return false;
            break;
         }
    }
  }
  if (hold)
    cout << "Reflexive - Yes" << endl; 
  else
    cout << "Reflexive - No" << endl; 
return hold;
}

bool symmetric(int a[], int sizeOfA, int b[], int sizeOfB)
{
bool hold = true; // set hold to true
for(int i=0; i+1<sizeOfB; i+=2) // for each pair (e,f) in b
{
    int e = b[i];
    int f = b[i+1];
    if(is_in_relation(f, e, b, sizeOfB)) // if pair(e,f) is not in b
    {
        if(hold) // set hold to false
        {
            return false;
            break;
        }
    }
}
if(hold) // if hold return true
    cout << "Symmetric - Yes" << endl;
else // if hold is false return false
    cout << "Symmetric - No" << endl;
}

void antiSymmetric(int b[], int sizeOfB)
{
bool hold = true; // set hold to true
for(int i = 0; i < sizeOfB;) // for each pair (e,f) in b
{
    if(hold == false)
    {
        cout << "AntiSymmetric - No" << endl; 
        break; //Did not find (e,e) in b
    }
    for(int j = 0; j < sizeOfB;)
    {
        if(b[i] == b[j+1] && b[i+1] == b[j]) //If true, then pair(f,e) exists
        {
            if(b[i+1] != b[i]) //If true, relation is antisymmetric
            {
                hold = true;
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                hold = false;
                j = j + 2;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            hold = false;
            j = j + 2;
        }

    }
    i = i + 2;

}
if(hold == true)
    cout << "AntiSymmetric - Yes" << endl;

}

void transitive(int a[], int sizeOfA, int b[], int sizeOfB)
{

}

int main()
{
char keepGoing = 'y';
    while (keepGoing=='y') {

int set1[4] = {0, 1, 2, 3};
int rel1[8] = {0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3};
cout << "Set 1: " << endl;
reflexive(set1, 3, rel1, 4);
symmetric(set1, 3, rel1, 4);
antiSymmetric(set1, 3, rel1, 4);

cout << endl;
char set2[4] = {'x', 'y', 'z'};
char rel2[8] = {'x', 'y', 'y', 'z', 'y', 'y', 'z', 'z'};
cout << "Set 2: " << endl;
charReflexive(set2, 4, rel2, 8);
charSymmetric(set2, 4, rel2, 8);
charAntiSymmetric(set2, 4, rel2, 8);

cout << endl;
char set3[3] = {'x', 'y', 'z'};
char rel3[18] = {'x', 'x', 'y', 'z', 'x', 'y', 'z', 'y', 'x', 
                 'z', 'y', 'y', 'z', 'x', 'y', 'x', 'z', 'z'};
cout << "Set 3: " << endl;
charReflexive(set3, 3, rel3, 18);
charSymmetric(set3, 3, rel3, 18);
charAntiSymmetric(set3, 3, rel3, 18);

cout << endl;
int set4[8] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
int rel4[20] = {1, 7, 2, 5, 2, 8, 3, 6, 4, 7, 5, 8, 6, 6, 1, 1,
                2, 2};
cout << "Set 4: " << endl;
reflexive(set4, 8, rel4, 20);
symmetric(set4, 8, rel4, 20);
antiSymmetric(set4, 8, rel4, 20);

cout << endl << "Would you like to test it again? (y/n): ";
    cin >> keepGoing;
}

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your question needs to be more specific. What doesn't work? (i.e. what output do you expect, and what do you get?). Have you tried running on a minimal dataset in the debugger? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 16 '11 at 17:21
    
They are not working properly. What are they doing? What did you expect them to do? –  Mooing Duck Nov 16 '11 at 17:24
4  
Also, I'm no expert in set theory, but I thought properties like "reflexive" etc. applied to relations, not sets? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 16 '11 at 17:25
    
@OliCharlesworth: Given that two sets are passed to the function, I would assume that the question really is "How to determine if a pair of sets representing a relation, ...". –  André Caron Nov 16 '11 at 17:32
    
@AndréCaron: This is beyond my level of maths, then! What does it mean to ask "is a pair of sets representing a relation reflexive?"? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 16 '11 at 17:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I only read reflexive, but you need to rethink that. In general, if the first element in A is not equal to the first element in B, it prints "Reflexive - No" and stops. I don't think you thought that through all the way.

[EDIT] Alright, now that we've finally established what int a[] holds, and what int b[] holds, I have to start over. What everyone had before was completely wrong. (Me especially, my old "reflexive" was really symmetric, as well as interpreting the inputs wrong.) If you've learned about C++ classes/containers, I would highly recommend replacing int a[] and int b[] with something like:

template <class T>
struct relation {
    typedef std::pair<T,T> single_relation;

    std::set<T> elements;
    std::set<single_relation> all_relations;
};

or something similar, but that's just me.

reflexive:
    set holds to true
    for each element e in a
        if pair(e,e) is not in b
            set holds to false
            break
symmetric:
    set holds to true
    for each pair(e,f) in b
        if pair(f,e) is not in b
            set holds to false
            break
antisymetric: 
    set holds to true
    for each pair(e,f) in b
        if pair(f,e) is in b
            if f is not e
                set holds to false
                break
transitive:
    set holds to true
    for each pair(e,f) in b
        for each pair(f,g) in b
            if pair(e,g) is not in b
                set holds to false
                break
        if holds is false
            break

Note that only reflexive actually requires a[] at all.
Demo:

bool pair_is_in_relation(int left, int right, int b[], int sizeOfB)
{
    for(int i=0; i+1<sizeOfB; i+=2) {
        if (b[i]==left && b[i+1]==right)
            return true;
    }
    return false;
}
bool antiSymmetric(int b[], int sizeOfB) 
{
    bool holds = true;
    for(int i=0; i+1<sizeOfB; i+=2) {
        int e = b[i];
        int f = b[i+1];
        if(pair_is_in_relation(f, e, b, sizeOfB)) {
            if (e != f) {
                holds = false;
                break;
             }
        }
    }
    if (holds)
        std::cout << "AntiSymmetric - Yes" << endl; 
    else
        std::cout << "AntiSymmetric - No" << endl; 
    return holds;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In none of his for(int j does he increment j. Not that it matters, he always breaks out of it at the first iteration... –  K-ballo Nov 16 '11 at 17:36
    
@Mooning Duck... i used your pseudo code but it is giving reflexive for all of my relations. How can I post the function in the comment to show you? All I see is code but do not know how to use that here. Thanks. –  OSU222 Nov 16 '11 at 21:45
    
1. (0,0),(1,1) - reflexive 2. (0,0),(1,1),(1,2) - not reflexive 3. (1,2),(2,1),(1,1),(2,2) - reflexive –  OSU222 Nov 16 '11 at 22:01
    
Every element is related to itself, i.e., a relation ~ on R where x~x holds true for every x in R. How can I post the function in the comment? –  OSU222 Nov 16 '11 at 22:01
    
@MooingDuck... It is still telling me all relations are reflexive to the set. Please look above and see if I did this right. Thanks. –  OSU222 Nov 16 '11 at 22:54

For starters, what's the purpouse of this for loop where you never increment the variable being iterated?

for(j = 0; j < sizeOfB;)
{
    ...
}

And why having such an overcomplicated for endless loop if you are breaking out of it at the first iteration?

If you need to iterate over the cross product of both sets, you could use the following code snippet as a start:

for( int i = 0; i < sizeOfA; ++i )
{
    for( int j = 0; j < sizeOfB; ++j )
    {
        int elemA = a[i];
        int elemB = b[j];

        ... do your magic ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@K-ballo... This is looping through multiple times printing it out more than once. What am I doing wrong... I do not know how to post code into a comment so I edited my function above. –  OSU222 Nov 16 '11 at 21:13
    
@K-ballo.. When your declaring elemB should it be b[j] not b[i]? –  OSU222 Nov 16 '11 at 21:21
    
@Craig Ashworth: Your code needs quite some work just in order to get it to tell whether every element of A is also in B, and that's just a start. I would recommend you post a separate question on how to implement just reflexive, what does it mean (to you) and maybe some samples on expected output. –  K-ballo Nov 16 '11 at 21:22
    
@Craig Ashwort: Indeed it should be b[j]. Good catch, fixed. –  K-ballo Nov 16 '11 at 21:22

First of all, you need to get your terminology straight: A set S isn't reflexive, symmetric, transitive or anything of the sort. That is why you're having such a hard time visualizing what transitive(...) should do.

Only a particular binary relation B on a particular set S can be reflexive, symmetric and transitive.

Now, let's think of this in terms of a set and a relation. Let's assume you have a function, conveniently called relation:

bool relation(int a, int b) 
{
    /* some code here that implements whatever 'relation' models. We will
     * pick some relation we know to be reflective, transitive and symmetric.
     * For example: 
     */
    return (a == b);
}

Let's add a bad relation too, just for fun. You can use it to test:

bool relation_bad(int a, int b) 
{
    /* some code here that implements whatever 'relation' models. This is
     * a relation that isn't symmetric, but it is reflexive and transitive. 
     */
    return (a >= b);
}

Now, you want to code up 'reflexive'. Reflexivity means that an item is related to itself:

bool reflexive(int *s, int items) 
{
    for(int i = 0; i != items; i++)
    {
        if(!relation(s[i], s[i]))
            return false;
    }

    return true;
}

And now, 'symmetric'. Symmetry means that if a is related to be, then b must be related to a:

bool symmetric(int *s, int items)
{
    for(int i = 0; i != items; i++)
    { // for every item in the set:
        for(int j = 0; j != items; j++)
        { // check against every other items (including itself!)
            if(relation(s[i], s[j]) != relation(s[j], s[i])
                return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

I won't code transitive for you, but transitivity means that if a is related to b, and b is related to c, then a must be related to c.

You can see that you will need three loops and more complicated check here.

share|improve this answer
\\to find symetric relation
#include<iostream.h>
using namespace std;
main() {
    int a[5],b[5],c,d=0,e,f;
    cout<<"Enter 1st elemtnts: ";
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
        cin>>a[i];
    }
    cout<<"Enter second elemnt :";
    for(int j=0;j<5;j++){
        cin>>b[j];
    }
    for(c=0;c<5;c++){
        for(d=0;d<5;d++){
            if(a[c]==b[d]){
                cout<<"("<<a[c]<<",";
                cout<<b[d]<<")";
            }     
        }
    }   
    cout<<" Are the symetric \n\n";
    system("pause");
}                     
share|improve this answer

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