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I have some classes that implement an interface, but also extend the Sprite class:

package {
    public interface IState {
        function addMonster():void;
    }
}

package {
    public class Fuzzy extends Sprite implements IState {
        public function addMonster():void {

        }
    }
}

package {
    public class LizardSkin extends Sprite implements IState {
        public function addMonster():void {

        }
    }
}

// Document class 

package {
    public class Main extends MovieClip {
        private var state:IState;
        public function Main():void {
            state = new Fuzzy();

            addChild(state);
        }
    }
}

When I try to addChild(state) I keep getting an error message 1067: Implicit coercion of a value of type IState to an unrelated type flash.display:DisplayObject.

Now I know I've seen examples where a class extends MovieClip / Sprite and implements an interface...what can I do to make it so I can add "state" to the stage but also implement the methods I want??

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A simple cast should do it most of the time:

addChild(state as DisplayObject);

The compiler raises that error otherwise because it doesn't assume IState is always implemented by something that is a DisplayObject, but if you can guarantee that condition you can always cast.

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THANKS this helped a lot. I thought I was going to have to write a whole abstract class that implemented the interface. –  redconservatory Nov 16 '11 at 17:43

What I do in situations like this is use an IDisplayable interface, that looks like this:

public interface IDisplayable
{
   function get displayObject():DisplayObject;
}

and its implementation in a Sprite or MovieClip simply looks like this:

public function get displayObject():DisplayObject
{
     return this;
}

Your IState objects could then be added to the stage using addChild(state.displayObject);, when your IState interface extends IDisplayable.

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I use this method as well. An additional benefit is you can have a class be an "Actor" for a DisplayObject, rather than forcing your own class to extend DisplayObject. Coded right, the "handler" won't notice a difference between the two situations. –  IQAndreas Nov 16 '11 at 19:23

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