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I have a single window with a single custom view in it, and I want the custom view to resize with the window so that it entirely fills it at any time. If I write:

NSView *contentView = [self.window contentView];
CustomView *customView = [[CustomView alloc] initWithFrame:[contentView bounds]];
[contentView addSubview:customView];
[contentView addConstraint:
    [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:customView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth
        relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
        toItem:contentView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth
        multiplier:1
        constant:0]];
[contentView addConstraint:
    [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:customView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeHeight
        relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
        toItem:contentView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeHeight
        multiplier:1
        constant:0]];

Then the window doesn't let me resize it.
If I add:

[customView setTranslatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints:NO];

Then the custom view doesn't appear (drawRect: seems to never be called). I tried different ways (including the visual format @"|[customview]|") but I always run into the same problems. I know it could be done with the older autoresizing system, with:

[customView setAutoresizingMask:NSViewWidthSizable|NSViewHeightSizable];

but I want to use the Cocoa Auto Layout system, and I want to use it for more complicated cases (like several custom views that always fill the window).

Does anyone know what is wrong and how I should use the Auto Layout system to get the result that I want?

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1  
This might help for debugging: [[contentView constraints].window visualizeConstraints:contentView.constraints]; –  Regexident Nov 16 '11 at 19:17
    
I’ve tested three different ways of using Auto Layout for the situation you’ve described and all three work. There must be something else in your code that’s preventing Auto Layout from working as expected. Could you upload a minimal test case that reproduces your problem? –  Bavarious Nov 17 '11 at 8:48
    
Indeed, it does work, I cannot find what the problem was... I may at one point have applied the constraints before adding the view to the superview (but that does output an error on the console and I haven't seen it). Or maybe there was something else wrong, and by asking the question, it made me rewrite everything from scratch without the initial problem... –  Guillaume Nov 17 '11 at 18:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 81 down vote accepted

With Auto Layout, there are (at least) three possible ways to constrain a view so that it occupies the entire window’s content view, resizing when appropriate.

Visual format constraints with regard to superview

NSView *contentView = [_window contentView];
MyView *customView = [[MyView alloc] initWithFrame:[contentView bounds]];
[customView setTranslatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints:NO];

[contentView addSubview:customView];

NSDictionary *views = NSDictionaryOfVariableBindings(customView);

[contentView addConstraints:
    [NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"H:|[customView]|"
        options:0
        metrics:nil
        views:views]];

[contentView addConstraints:
    [NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:|[customView]|"
    options:0
    metrics:nil
    views:views]];

Programmatic constraints for the edges

(this should be equivalent to the visual format above)

+ (void)addEdgeConstraint:(NSLayoutAttribute)edge superview:(NSView *)superview subview:(NSView *)subview {
    [superview addConstraint:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:subview
        attribute:edge
        relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
        toItem:superview
        attribute:edge
        multiplier:1
        constant:0]];
}

and

NSView *contentView = [_window contentView];
MyView *customView = [[MyView alloc] initWithFrame:[contentView bounds]];
[customView setTranslatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints:NO];

[contentView addSubview:customView];

[[self class] addEdgeConstraint:NSLayoutAttributeLeft superview:contentView subview:customView];
[[self class] addEdgeConstraint:NSLayoutAttributeRight superview:contentView subview:customView];
[[self class] addEdgeConstraint:NSLayoutAttributeTop superview:contentView subview:customView];
[[self class] addEdgeConstraint:NSLayoutAttributeBottom superview:contentView subview:customView];

Programmatic constraint for the size

NSView *contentView = [_window contentView];
MyView *customView = [[MyView alloc] initWithFrame:[contentView bounds]];
[customView setTranslatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints:NO];

[contentView addSubview:customView];

[contentView addConstraint:
    [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:customView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth
        relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
        toItem:contentView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth
        multiplier:1
        constant:0]];
[contentView addConstraint:
    [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:customView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeHeight
        relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
        toItem:contentView
        attribute:NSLayoutAttributeHeight
        multiplier:1
        constant:0]];

The third approach is the one listed in the question and it may not work if there are further constraints. For example, without:

[customView setTranslatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints:NO];

the original autoresize mask is applied as well, which leads to the behaviour described in the question: the window isn’t resized.

As mentioned by Regexident, you can use:

[_window visualizeConstraints:[contentView constraints]];

to debug Auto Layout. It’s worth checking the console output as well.

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1  
Note that the third approach is incomplete and will cause a SIGABRT because ios knows how tall and wide to make it, but not where to actually place it! You need to provide two of {start, finish, length} in each dimension. –  Benjamin Wheeler Jun 20 '13 at 14:48
    
@BenjaminWheeler Yup, I think you’re right. Feel free to edit the answer in case I don’t. –  Bavarious Jun 26 '13 at 7:05
    
Thank you. I did the same. It fits the screen properly. But I am unable to resize the NSPanel.Any idea?. –  Vignesh Sep 7 '13 at 12:22
1  
@Jbryson I think this is Cocoa, not Cocoa Touch, so NSView is what is needed. Cool heat tran app BTW... –  KKendall Sep 19 '13 at 15:14
1  
@KKendall Thanks for the NSView heads up, I hadn't realized the context wasn't iOS! –  Jbryson Sep 19 '13 at 21:45

@Bavarious's answer is good, I will just add a few more things.

It's really important to learn to use the built in debugging support! As with much development, it is not realistic to hope that you will always get everything right on the first shot. This was a major concern with auto layout, so we put a lot of effort into debugging. Steps, briefly:

  1. Determine a view that is in the wrong place. Calling the method -[NSView _subtreeDescription] from gdb and/or passing the arguments -NSShowAllViews YES can help identify which view is wrong.
  2. Determine the constraint or constraints that is wrong or missing. -[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsAffectingLayoutForOrientation:] helps give you a smaller set of constraints to work on. -[NSWindow visualizeConstraints:] can help you see what those constraints are and you can see from that which of those isn't something you want to be there. It also will show you if your layout is ambiguous (not enough constraints).
  3. Determine where the wrong constraint came from. The Cocoa Layout template in Instruments is sort of like the Leaks instrument - it'll show you all the events in the life cycle of a constraint, like where it was created, added to a window, modified, etc. So once you know what constraint is the problem, use the search field in Instruments to filter down to just viewing that constraint, and you can see backtraces for all the lifecycle events and figure out where you did something you didn't want.

Usually the kind of question you'd post (my stuff doesn't work!) will not be enough for people to tell what's wrong, which is one of the reason's it's important to use the debugging stuff. See the WWDC 2011 session video (free for all) and docs for more on this.

Buuuuut I can actually tell what went wrong this time. :-) Before you turned off translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints, you were more constrained than you wanted to be - the width and height of your view were fixed as well, which is why the window couldn't resize. AFTER you turned it off though, you had ambiguous layout, because you hadn't fastened your view onto anything! You had said how big it should be (same as the superview), but not where it was supposed to be.

Ken

Cocoa Frameworks, primary auto layout author

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Thanks for the answer, especially the clear explanations at the end which help me understand what went wrong. –  Guillaume Nov 20 '11 at 16:58
5  
Ken, just wanted to say awesome job on auto layout. Took me a while to grasp how to use it effectively, but I've been able to do some pretty powerful stuff with it. Cheers! –  sudo rm -rf Jul 26 '12 at 5:59
    
I second sudo, autolayout is an impressive piece of work. –  Dave Branton Aug 2 '12 at 1:37

I have discovered that -drawRect: willnot get called in the event the frame rectangle is 0,0,0,0. Undesirable constraints seem to cause the frame to become 0,0,0,0.

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1  
This is also true if either width or height is zero. –  Dave Branton Aug 2 '12 at 1:39

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