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I've used WiX, InstallShield, and other installation generators and have experienced nothing but headaches.

Are there any installation libraries out there that can be linked in to an actual C++/C# program and run as a setup executable and doesn't need to be written in a custom declarative-installation-language ala WiX/InstallShield?

Edit:

The problem is putting complex decision logic in WiX is tedious. Debugging custom actions is a nightmare and debugging managed CAs is even worse. Our CAs need to execute on remote machines due to AD requirements which adds even more hell to the debugging process. When I sit back and ask "What is WiX giving me" the answer is "very little". I'm spending most of my time fighting the WiX system than improving/maintaining. If a library exists that gave transactional file/registry entry support and focused on installer-related functionality, that's what I want.

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The tools you list can be used to drive C++ and C# code. – David Heffernan Nov 16 '11 at 19:31
    
This is true; right now we're using WiX with a lot of Custom Actions. – clemahieu Nov 16 '11 at 19:42
    
Well, what's the problem then? Sounds like you already have the answer! – David Heffernan Nov 16 '11 at 19:43
    
The problem is putting complex decision logic in WiX is tedious. Debugging custom actions is a nightmare and debugging managed CAs is even worse. Our CAs need to execute on remote machines due to AD requirements which adds even more hell to the debugging process. When I sit back and ask "What is WiX giving me" the answer is "very little". I'm spending most of my time fighting the WiX system than improving/maintaining. If a library exists that gave transactional file/registry entry support and focused on installer-related functionality, that's what I want. – clemahieu Nov 16 '11 at 19:53
    
Stop writing this detail in comments and start writing it in the question. Then you have some chance of getting good help. Your question needs to be improved significantly. – David Heffernan Nov 16 '11 at 19:56

You're not saying the exact problems you encountered, but you seem unhappy with the usability of the tools you tried. I recommend trying other setup authoring tools to see which one fits your needs best. You can find a list here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_installation_software

As a rule of thumb, free tools are hard to use but get the job done and commercial tools are easy to use but they are not free.

Regarding your actual question, no there aren't any installer libraries you can use in your application. You will find only installation engines. You basically choose between Windows Installer (MSI packages and Active Directory support) and proprietary engines which may or may not work the way you want.

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When you can live with support for your installer to Windows Vista+ then you should have a look at the Transaction support of Windows for the registry and NTFS. A very good overview can be found at CodeProject.

Yes MSI is very complex but I do think many of your headaches originate from the fact that you are trying to do too much during install.

There is a time to do stuff after installing your software. This time is called first startup where you can do complex things like AD deployment with a user interface that is under your full control which is much easier to debug. But I doubt that you will get rollback support done for failed AD changes.

A rule of the thumb is that you should not change the AD schema to make your software happy since many customers do forbid schema changes. Manager should read this as: You will loose customers due to AD deployment issues. IT admins can have a big influence what software is bought and which not.

If you had problems with MSI it is likely that you hit a wall with not working updates due to unintended MSI component violations. I have done a small writeup about the issues I have encountered so far. There are also many issues lurking with combined x32/x64 installations.

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