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I recently rewrote some code in one of my classes, which gave me an error with an NSString. Here is what I have now:

My class header:

@interface MyViewController : UITableViewController {
   NSString *myString;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *myString; // Or copy instead of retain.

@end

And implemented some methods:

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    myString = @"This is";

    if (something) {
        myString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ a string.", myString]; // *1
    }

    [myString retain]; // <-- Why do I have to retain/copy here?
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    if (indexPath.row == 0) {
        /* Some code for creating a UITextView called myTextView */
        // ..and then setting the text property:
        myTextView.text = myString; // <-- Crashes here if I don't retain/copy in viewDidLoad.
    }
}

After some debugging I figured I had to retain/copy the NSString.

Why do I have to retain/copy the NSString in viewDidLoad if I want to use it later on?

Also, I noticed that if I remove the line marked *1, I don't have to retain/copy.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you use the synthesized setter method to assign the variable, it will automatically retain the NSString for you:

if (something) {
    self.myString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ a string.", myString]; // *1
}
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Thanks, that fixed it. –  matsr Nov 17 '11 at 13:17

One way for you to better understand this would be to prefix your private attribute with an underscore _myString and keep your property as myString - this would make it easy to work out which is being used - the attribute or the property.

As you only seem to be using the value in your class I would question why you have a property at all as I think this is the source of the confusion.

If you have put the prefix in place then you will always know that _myString will need to have a retain when it is assigned to and myString will retain automatically.

The line at *1 is replacing the value of myString with a new string and for some reason this value is autoreleased before your code in the 2nd method is processed. I can't remember the exact reason, but I think this doesn't happen for the first assignment because you create a string literal with @"This is" which is not autoreleased.

I hope this helps.

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You can use the retained property accessors which will release/retain automatically

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    self.myString = @"This is";
    if (something) {
        self.myString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ a string.", myString]; // *1
    }
    // no need to retain
}

The reason it does not crash when you remove the line marked *1 is because myString is still pointing at @"This is", which is a litteral, which lives in a corner of memory for the entire duration of the program and is never destroyed, hence that memory location remains valid.

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