Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two classes (CoinFlip and Incr) in different files and I'm trying to import Incr to use in CoinFlip:

package com.iRprojects.Book.Java;

import java.util.*; 
import com.iRprojects.Book.Java.*;

public class CoinFlip { 

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int g = 5;

        System.out.println(incr(g));

    }
}   

and

package com.iRprojects.Book.Java;

public class Incr {
    public static int incr(int i){
        i++;
        return i;
    }
}

With the classes like this eclipse says incr() isn't found.

If I change it to:

package com.iRprojects.Book.Java;

import java.util.*; 
//import com.iRprojects.Book.Java.*;

public class CoinFlip { 

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int g = 5;

        System.out.println(com.iRprojects.Book.Java.Incr.incr(g));

    }
}   

It compiles fine. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In this case you have to write:

import static com.iRprojects.Book.Java.Incr.*;

This means import of all static members from com.iRprojects.Book.Java.Incr class taking into account the access modifiers.

share|improve this answer
    
Just to clarify, that will import not only the static methods but also the static fields. –  Nate W. Nov 16 '11 at 20:06
    
Yes you are right. I will edit my answer. –  itun Nov 16 '11 at 20:08
add comment

Your code is incorrect...you are trying to access incr as if it was a local method to class CoinFlip.

In fact, it is defined in the Incr class, and there fore should be accessed like:

System.out.println(new Incr().incr(g));

Also, please consider using proper sun recommendations for you package declarations.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I made that package name before I knew to do all lowercase. So even though its static method I still have to create an object when importing another class? –  iRector Nov 16 '11 at 20:02
    
No you don't. See answer given by @unholysampler et al. –  Sri Sankaran Nov 16 '11 at 20:08
add comment

incr() is a static method of Incr. When you don't explicitly state the class name, java will only look within the containing class. Since CoinFlip does not implement incr(), you get the error.

You also do not need the fully qualified path of the class name, Incr.incr() is fine.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Either use a static import or write Incr.incr()

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.