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If I have a function say:

var my_function = function()
  {
  }

If the function is not called, it is not taking up memory, it is just text sitting in memory.

However if you call it by say...

function_instance = new my_function();

It is instantiated is a sort of way, and the variables and methods it contains are loaded into memory.

Is this a way to represent a class/object model similar to C++?

Is my interpretation correct?

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Could you ask more precisely? –  Griwes Nov 16 '11 at 20:48
2  
Either your interpretation is incorrect, or your terminology is very... "unusual". –  delnan Nov 16 '11 at 20:49
    
In what way do you think this would be similar to C++? –  Michael Price Nov 16 '11 at 20:54
    
"and the variables and methods it contains are loaded into memory" how does that apply to a function? does a function have methods in javascript? –  PlasmaHH Nov 16 '11 at 20:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"a way to represent a class/object model similar to C++" would be through the use of prototypes.

As Kevin M pointed out, you can use the this keyword to create instance variables in a function, like so:

var my_function(foo)
{
  this.foo = foo;
  this.bar = function()
  {
    // bar-ing here
  }
}

The problem however, that whenever you instantiate my_function(), a new instance of the my_function.bar function is also created. Enter prototypes:

var barPrototype = { "bar" : function()
  {
    // bar-ing here
  }
};

var my_function(foo)
{
  this.foo = foo;
}
my_function.prototype = barPrototype;

So, to sum it all up, the prototype keyword can be used to create function-specific, inheritable properties that are analoguous to C++'s member functions. Member functions of C++ aren't instantiated for each instance of a class. Instead, the compiler adds a this pointer to the function's parameters; this pointer points to the instance that the member function is called on.

More JSey fun to be had here: http://javascript.infogami.com/Javascript_in_Ten_Minutes

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In javascript, the class concept does not exist. Everything is an object. When you use the new operator it copies the prototype of that function into a new object. In other words, you can emulate what class can do in c++, but it's not a class.

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@Francis, right, he concept of "class" doesn't exist yet on the language, constructor functions are often called "classes" and although this may seem just a small terminology problem, it will be a real mess when the class syntax will be finally approved and standardized, probably for the next edition of ECMAScript, you won't know if somebody it talking about constructor functions or "real" ECMAScript classes... I don't agree with the "Everything is an object." part, the language has primitive types, and they are not objects, more info: stackoverflow.com/q/3907613#3907659 –  CMS Nov 16 '11 at 21:18

In JavaScript a new class is defined by creating a function. The function may contain other functions (methods), properties, etc.

When a function is called using the new operation the function becomes a constructor for that class. Inside the constructor the variable " this " is created and points to the object.

function Man(){
    this.name = 'John';
}

var person = new Man;
console.log(person.name);
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It is designed to behave like a class. They are pretty much the same thing. This is object oriented JavaScript. A nice link to read more about polymorphism, sub classing, prototyping, inheritance, etc mckoss.com/jscript/object.htm –  Kevin M Nov 16 '11 at 21:06

As mentioned, Javascript functions can act as objects so Javascript can be object oriented but object inheritance is prototypical and not like C++. John Resig, the creator of jQuery, has done some work on emulating traditional classes and inheritance in javascript. You could take a look at his blog for an interesting example:

http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-javascript-inheritance/

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