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I have a problem with my code posted below, set and get methods. I want to call it like this this.LastError.Set(1);

But it gives me this error: 'int' does not contain a definition for 'Set' and no extension method 'Set' accepting a first argument of type 'int' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

public class MyClass
    {
        private int ERROR_NUM = 0;
        public int LastError
        {
            get { return ERROR_NUM; }
            set { ERROR_NUM = value; }
        }

        bool IsLoaded()
        {
            int count = Process.GetProcessesByName("AppName").Length;
            if (count == 1) return true;
            if (count > 1) this.LastError.Set(1);
            return false;
        }
    }

I know this is probably a dumb question so sorry for that, I've been fighting with this thing for a couple hours now and I've even gone so far as to try and give the LastError its own class. This is my first day on C#.

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Use this.LastError = 1; It will automatically call the set { } for assignment. Additionally you do not really need a backing field called ERROR_NUM = 0 instead you could use an auto property public int LastError { get; set; } –  J.Kommer Nov 16 '11 at 21:15
7  
Are you a Java programmer by chance? Expecting to call "set" explicitly and NAMING_YOUR_FIELDS_LIKE_IT_IS_STILL_1978 are clues. FYI in C# it is more idiomatic to namePrivateFieldsLikeThis. –  Eric Lippert Nov 16 '11 at 23:10
4  
Oh, and incidentally, the methods actually generated behind the scenes for you by the compiler are called get_LastError and set_LastError; if you try to make methods called that, you'll find that you get an error. –  Eric Lippert Nov 16 '11 at 23:11

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just set it.

this.LastError = 1;
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Thanks, was a dumb question then. About 100 answers as soon as I posted - you win because I think you were first. –  Drahcir Nov 16 '11 at 21:18

just do like this ..

 this.LastError = 1; 
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The whole point of properties is that they look like fields, you can get and set them like fields:

this.LastError = 1; // set the value
int lastError = this.LastError; // get the value

The property is compiled as two methods, set_LastError() and get_LastError(). You can't use them from C#, but the compiler can and compiles the code above to something like:

this.set_LastError(1);
int lastError = this.get_LastError();
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To set a property in C# simply use the "=" operator.

this.LastError = <myvalue>;
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You don't need to do this. Just set it like this

this.LastError = 1;

That's all

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To use a property you don't actually reference the get and set members, you just use the property directly like so:

this.LastError = 1;

int lastErrorNum = this.LastError;

based on whether you are getting or setting the property, the appropriate get or set portion will be used.

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In C# you would set it like this:

this.LastError = 1;
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The idea of properties is they act like they are fields on your class. Meaning you just get and set them like you would a normal variable Property = X; var x = Property

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You are working with a property. Properties encapsulates the Get and Set method. You don't call the Set method, instead you set the value directly to the property.

this.LastError = 1; 

Internally the object will call the Set method. A property is like a mix between a field of the class and a method: it looks like a field, but in reality it will trigger a method. Code is much simpler and easier to read with properties. Maybe you are used to other languages like Java that don't have the concept of properties, forcing you to explicitly call the Get and Set methods.

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