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I am graphically rendering my 'FOV' like so:

glBegin(GL_LINES);
glColor3f((220.0f / 255.0f), (220.0f / 255.0f), (220.0f / 255.0f));
for (int j = -2; j < 3; j++) {
    if (j == 0)continue;
    glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);
    glVertex3f((pxob->s * 3) * cos((pxob->rotating_angle * M_PI) + j * M_PI / 8), (pxob->s * 3) * sin((pxob->rotating_angle * M_PI) + j * M_PI / 8), 0);
}
glEnd();

but as this is just graphical, I am wondering what the best way to use this calculation of the cone, and use it so It will iterate through my objects and 'see' with the FOV.

This is a 2d Application with a 'top down' view, so the field of view will be like this

         \        /
          \ FOV  /
           \    /
            \__/
            |ob|

all objects are within a vector

I guess I'm asking whats the best way to implement a field of view?

  • How would I get all coords within the the FOV
  • How would I use the coords to find out what is in the FOV (is the best way to iterate through an array and see if any match for example)
  • Is there an easier way of going about this?
  • How can I work out what objects are within another object FOV
  • Also get the distance from the object to objects within the FOV
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1  
Press the link labeled "edit" under the post to update it. Also, how do you render an FOV? –  Nicol Bolas Nov 16 '11 at 22:26
    
What do you mean by "implement a field of view"? –  Nicol Bolas Nov 16 '11 at 23:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How would I get all coords within the the FOV

You can't, as this is a set of infinite size. But what you can do is write down that set by the boundaries of that set.

How would I use the coords to find out what is in the FOV (is the best way to iterate through an array and see if any match for example)

Think it other way round: How can I test if a certain point is element of the set of points forming the FOV. Now your FOV is some circle. Testing if a point is within a circle is very easy: Calculate distance from the center point, test if distance is smaller than circle radius.

Is there an easier way of going about this?

Depends on the projection you're using.

If using a orthographic projection, but you want to stick to a circular FOV, then testing the projected coordinate against the FOV circle radius is the way to go.

In a perspective projection taking the normalized vector from point of view to the to be tested point scalar product with the normalized viewing direction vector gives the cosine of the angle against the viewing axis. In a perspective projection the FOV usually refers to a angle.

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thanks, please see updates. –  Elgoog Nov 17 '11 at 0:59

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