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I just found this:

Note: a:hover MUST come after a:link and a:visited in the CSS definition in order to be effective!!

Note: a:active MUST come after a:hover in the CSS definition in order to be effective!!

Note: Pseudo-class names are not case-sensitive.

Does this mean that this is INCORRECT?

a:link, a:visited, a:active {
color: #006699;
text-decoration: none;
}

a:hover {
color: #2089CC;
text-decoration: underline;
}

Sadly the source is: http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_pseudo_classes.asp

If you don't know why the 'sadly', please visit http://w3fools.com

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Whenever in doubt go to the specs. And here's an excerpt from the specs.

Note that the A:hover must be placed after the A:link and A:visited rules, since otherwise the cascading rules will hide the 'color' property of the A:hover rule

What you have is correct

a:link, a:visited, a:active {
   color: #006699;
   text-decoration: none;
}

a:hover {
   color: #2089CC;
   text-decoration: underline;
}

That's why this works.

This below would be incorrect.

a:hover {
   color: #2089CC;
   text-decoration: underline;
}

a:link, a:visited, a:active {
   color: #006699;
   text-decoration: none;
}

That's why this doesn't work.

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just a small question, is a {...}; a:hover {...};, the same thing as a:link, a:visited, a:active{...}; a:hover {...};? –  ajax333221 Nov 16 '11 at 22:57
    
Isn't it superfluous to write a:link, a:visited, a:active? Wouldn't a:link, a:visited suffice? –  feklee Jan 27 '13 at 16:21

Your proposed way of including a style for each pseudoclass does not allow each pseudoclass to override the last. When you combine the styles like that, then they are simply applied together as a group.

For example, the :active pseudoclass comes last, so that it overrides :focus, or :hover pseudoclasses before it. This makes sense if you think of a link becoming active when clicked and you want a new style to be applied while the user is still hovering over the link with their cursor.

The true order is as follows:

a:link {
  ⋮ declarations
}
a:visited {
  ⋮ declarations
}
a:focus {
  ⋮ declarations
}
a:hover {
  ⋮ declarations
}
a:active {
  ⋮ declarations
}

Here is a little reassurance for you.

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hello, If all links share the same color/text-deco (except hover), how can I blend them into only 1 line without having trouble overriding something? –  ajax333221 Nov 16 '11 at 22:36
    
a lot of people use dotlesscss.org for working with css like a more robust programming language. It might help you out here if you're interested. –  BumbleB2na Nov 16 '11 at 22:39

From the CSS 2.1 specification on dynamic pseudo selectors:

Note that the A:hover must be placed after the A:link and A:visited rules, since otherwise the cascading rules will hide the 'color' property of the A:hover rule. Similarly, because A:active is placed after A:hover, the active color (lime) will apply when the user both activates and hovers over the A element.

Interestingly, the current CSS3 draft specification does not seem to mention this (or at least not as clearly).

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