Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The formal statement of universal approximation theorem states that neural nets with single hidden layer can approximate any function which is continuous on m-dimensional unit hypercube. But how about functions which are not continuous, is anything known about whether they can be always approximated by neural nets?

For example take a function which calculates n'th digit of number pi. If I train some single hidden layer neural net on this data: (n, n'th digit of pi), will it be eventually able to return correct values for unseen n's? How about multiple hidden layers neural nets?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think you can use a neural net to predict digits of PI, because the digits of PI do not follow a pattern. I think you probably could use machine learning to come up with an algorithm that approximates PI however... –  Aerik Nov 16 '11 at 23:28
    
Well there is a formula: math.hmc.edu/funfacts/ffiles/20010.5.shtml , so I think maybe neural net will eventually figure it out? –  Sunny88 Nov 16 '11 at 23:30
    
@ffriend ANN can't simulate polynomials with variable degrees? But according to universal approximation theorem it should be able to, because they can be continuous functions. For example f(x) = x^(x+1) is continuous on [0,1], so it should be able to be represented. –  Sunny88 Nov 17 '11 at 15:15
    
@ffriend "But final approximating function will be a fixed degree polynomial" How can that be? If we take sigmoid as activation function(which i believe is standard practice), the neural net output value will be of the form 1/(1+e^t), which doesn't look like polynomial to me. –  Sunny88 Nov 18 '11 at 0:44
    
@Sunny88: sorry, my error. Just played around with polynomial kernel nets (which seem to be next generation ANNs) and forgot about simple sigmoid :D However, the idea stays the same: neither with polynomial, nor with sigmoid activation function you cannot represent this formula exactly, and simple approximation will hardly fit your needs of predicting exact number. –  ffriend Nov 18 '11 at 2:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The formal statement of universal approximation theorem states that neural nets with single hidden layer can approximate any function which is continuous on m-dimensional unit hypercube. But how about functions which are not continuous, is anything known about whether they can be always approximated by neural nets?

Yes, most non-continuous functions can be approximated by neural nets. In fact, the function only needs to be measurable since, by Lusin's theorem, any measurable function is continuous on nearly all of its domain. This is good enough for the universal approximation theorem.

Note, however, that the theorem only says that a function can be represented by a neural net. It does not say whether this representation can be learned or that it would be efficient. In fact, for a single-layer net approximating a highly varying function, the size grows exponentially with the function's complexity.

For example take a function which calculates n'th digit of number pi. If I train some single hidden layer neural net on this data: (n, n'th digit of pi), will it be eventually able to return correct values for unseen n's? How about multiple hidden layers neural nets?

No. There is an infinite number of functions returning any subsequence of digits of π. The net would never know which one you want it to learn. Neural nets generalize by taking advantage of function smoothness, but the sequence you want it to learn is not smooth at all.

In other words, you need an exact representation. An approximation is not useful for predicting the digits of π. The universal approximation theorem only guarantees the existence of an approximation.

share|improve this answer
1  
"No. There is an infinite number of functions returning any subsequence of digits of π. The net would never know which one you want it to learn." This reason seems very strange to me, for isn't there ALWAYS infinitely many functions representing any input-output data? Yet neural nets can solve those problems, but not this one? –  Sunny88 Nov 17 '11 at 15:05
1  
Neural nets solve those problems, where the function is smooth and an approximate representation is helpful. This is not the case with the digit sequence. –  Don Reba Nov 17 '11 at 19:44

Well, considering the formula for n-th digit of pi exists, then it can be represented by a NN (1 HL for continuous function, 2HL for non-continuous).

The only problem is the learning process - most likely it would be near impossible to escape shallow local minima (that's my guess).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.