Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

At the moment I have

val orders = new HashMap[Int, Int]
orders.put(36, 110)
orders.put(35, 90)
orders.put(34, 80)
orders.put(33, 60)

I would like to keep a running so that the end mapping appears as follows

36 -> 110
35 -> 200
34 -> 280
33 -> 340

At the moment I do this imperatively as follows

val keys = orders.keys.toList.sortBy(x => -x)
val accum = new HashMap[Int, Int]
accum.put(keys.head, orders(keys.head))
for (i <- 1 to keys.length - 1) {
  accum.put(keys(i), orders(keys(i)) + accum(keys(i-1)))
}
accum.foreach {
  x => println(x._1, x._2)
}

Is there a more functional way of doing this using mapping, folding etc? I would be able to do it with a straight List but the can't quite wrap my head around how to do this with HashMap

Edit: Ordering is important. The left column (36, 35, 34, 33) needs to be in descending order

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For the record, here is a solution using the inits method:

 import scala.collection.mutable._

 // use a LinkedHashMap to keep the order
 val orders = new LinkedHashMap[Int, Int]
 orders.put(36, 110)
 orders.put(35, 90)
 orders.put(34, 80)
 orders.put(33, 60)


// create a list of init sequences with no empty element
orders.toSeq.inits.toList.dropRight(1).

  // > this returns
  // ArrayBuffer((36,110), (35,90), (34,80), (33,60)) 
  // ArrayBuffer((36,110), (35,90), (34,80)) 
  // ArrayBuffer((36,110), (35,90)) 
  // ArrayBuffer((36,110)) 

  // now take the last key of each sequence and sum the values of the sequence
  map(init => (init.last._1, init.map(_._2).sum)).reverse.toMap.mkString("\n")

  36 -> 110
  35 -> 200
  34 -> 280
  33 -> 340
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Very readable. –  Dominic Bou-Samra Nov 17 '11 at 6:24

Since HashMaps aren't sorted, it's not so simple to do this directly, so convert to an ordered sequence first:

val elems = orders.toSeq.sortBy(-_._1)
             .scanLeft(0,0)((x, y) => (y._1, x._2 + y._2)).tail

  // ArrayBuffer((36,110), (35,200), (34,280), (33,340))

If you actually want to stick these in an ordered map with reverse ordering, rather than just print them out, you could do this:

val accum = collection.SortedMap(elems: _*)(
            new Ordering[Int] { def compare(x: Int, y: Int) = y compare x })

  // SortedMap[Int,Int] = Map(36 -> 110, 35 -> 200, 34 -> 280, 33 -> 340)
share|improve this answer
2  
Ordering.Int.reverse would look slightly better than new Ordering[Int] { def compare(x: Int, y: Int) = y compare x }. –  missingfaktor Nov 17 '11 at 5:27

This should work:

val orders = new HashMap[Int, Int]
orders.put(36, 110)
orders.put(35, 90)
orders.put(34, 80)
orders.put(33, 60)

val accum = new HashMap[Int, Int]

orders.toList.sortBy(-_._1).foldLeft(0){
    case (sum, (k, v)) => {
     accum.put(k, sum + v)
     sum + v
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I think you are doing it wrong. Don't create a Map directly: create a sequence. In this case, a ListBuffer is probably the most appropriate, so that you can easily append elements to it. It also supports constant time toList, though that shouldn't matter here.

If you must use a functional approach, you can either prepend to a List and reverse it, or go the way of iteratees. I'm not comfortable enough with the latter to explain them, though.

Once you have your collection, you'll scanLeft it. Or, if you built a List, you could scanRight it instead of having to reverse it. After that, it is a simple matter of calling toMap on the result.

Roughly speaking:

var accum: List[(Int, Int)] = Nil
accum ::= 36 -> 110
accum ::= 35 -> 90
accum ::= 34 -> 80
accum ::= 33 -> 60

val orders = accum.scanRight(0 -> 0) {
  case ((k, v), (_, acc)) => (k, v + acc)
}.init.toMap

The init drops the seed. I could have avoided having to do that using tail and head, but that would require a check to see if accum is empty.

The var can be removed using either iteratees, or, perhaps, using the state monad at a higher level.

share|improve this answer
    
I was using a Map for insertion speed otherwise would have gone with List –  deltanovember Nov 17 '11 at 2:59
2  
@deltanovember adding to the head of an immutable list is likely faster than inserting in a Map. Think about how linked lists work. –  Luigi Plinge Nov 17 '11 at 11:06
var sum = 0
orders.toList.sortBy (-_._1).map (o =>
  {sum += o._2; (o._1 -> sum) }).toMap 

Not very elegant, since it uses a var.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.