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Here is what I am doing:

  1. Update the record and store its original values
  2. Later on compare the record's values against the original values to see what has changed
  3. Mark those changes in a piece of plain text

However, I've come across something unexpected at #1

def update
  @hardware = Hardware.find(params[:id])
  old_hardware = @hardware
  old_hardware_status_id = @hardware.status_id

  test_text = "#{old_hardware[:status_id]} - BV #{old_hardware_status_id} - BSUB #{params[:hardware][:status_id]}"

  respond_to do |format|
    if @hardware.update_attributes(params[:hardware])
      test_text = "#{test_text}<p>#{old_hardware[:status_id]} - AV #{old_hardware_status_id} - ASUB #{params[:hardware][:status_id]}"

      format.html { 
        render :text => test_text
        #redirect_to(@hardware, :notice => "Hardware was successfully updated.") 
      }
      format.xml  { head :ok }
    else
      format.html { render :action => "edit" }
      format.xml  { render :xml => @hardware.errors, :status => :unprocessable_entity }
    end
  end
end

Gives the following output:

5 - BV 5 - BSUB 10
10 - AV 5 - ASUB 10 

One would expect it to be:

5 - BV 5 - BSUB 10
5 - AV 5 - ASBU 10

It looks like when params or a subset of params is used as the value of a new variable, the new variable is just referencing the same exact address/value as params rather than creating a new instance of the values. The same thing occurs if you do something like duplicate_params = params.dup prior to the update_attributes line, and then output the different attributes of duplicate_params...

def update
  @hardware = Hardware.find(params[:id])
  old_params = params[:hardware].dup
  old_hardware_status_id = @hardware.status_id

  test_text = "#{old_params[:status_id]} - BV #{old_hardware_status_id} - BSUB #{params[:hardware][:status_id]}"

  respond_to do |format|
    if @hardware.update_attributes(params[:hardware])
      test_text = "#{test_text}<p>#{old_params[:status_id]} - AV #{old_hardware_status_id} - ASUB #{params[:hardware][:status_id]}"

      format.html { 
        render :text => test_text
        #redirect_to(@hardware, :notice => "Hardware was successfully updated.") 
      }
      format.xml  { head :ok }
    else
      format.html { render :action => "edit" }
      format.xml  { render :xml => @hardware.errors, :status => :unprocessable_entity }
    end
  end
end

Gives the following output:

5 - BV 5 - BSUB 10
10 - AV 5 - ASUB 10 

One would expect it to be:

5 - BV 5 - BSUB 10
5 - AV 5 - ASBU 10

In other words, once update_attributes runs, any value based on the original params, such as old_hardware or duplicate_params, is updated.

But it doesn't happen if, in the original instance, you do: old_hardware = @hardware.dup, which gives you:

5 - BV 5 - BSUB 10
5 - AV 5 - ASBU 10

Questions:

  1. Why does "duplicate_params = params.dup" not work while "old_hardware = @hardware.dup" work?
  2. Is this an atypical situation? I've only encountered this when duplicating params and @models, and it seems inconsistent to the rest of my RoR experience.
share|improve this question

You interpolate the string before the update, change the value, then prepend the old string with the previously-interpolated value, onto the front of a string containing the new value.

That's what I'd expect to happen--the old values in the first string aren't re-interpolated after the update.

Edit Duping maps works fine:

> foo = { hardware: { id: 10, foo: "bar" } }
=> {:hardware=>{:id=>10, :foo=>"bar"}}

> old = foo[:hardware].dup
=> {:id=>10, :foo=>"bar"}

> foo[:hardware]
=> {:id=>10, :foo=>"bar"}

> foo[:hardware][:foo] = "baz"
=> "baz"

> foo[:hardware]
=> {:id=>10, :foo=>"baz"}

> old
=> {:id=>10, :foo=>"bar"}
share|improve this answer
    
I've either been looking at code too long today or you missed the intent of the post - or perhaps both. If the original version of test_text = A A B, then the second result should also be A A B, not B A B. Even if dumped to a log file the result is the same, so even without interpolation, why does RoR show this behavior here? And this still doesn't answer why @hardware.dup works but params.dup doesn't. – Pope Nov 17 '11 at 0:21
    
@Pope Why should the first code output AAB? You update it to 10. old_hardware references the same instance @hardware does. – Dave Newton Nov 17 '11 at 0:28
    
Gotcha. So 1.) How should one duplicate data in this instance? 2.) Why does .dup not work on params? – Pope Nov 17 '11 at 0:34
    
@Pope What's happening in the second case? – Dave Newton Nov 17 '11 at 0:36
    
I updated the post to make it a little more clear. The two examples (old_hardware = @hardware or old_params = params.dup) both give the same output: 5 5 10 / 10 5 10. Doing hardware.dup gives 5 5 10 / 5 5 10, which is the behavior I would expect and is the set of results needed. – Pope Nov 17 '11 at 0:39

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