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Anybody use NoSQL / InnoDB with Memcached? How stable is it? I have set it up yesterday and going to test today, but maybe you can share some knowledge also?

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Not sure what you mean by NoSQL/InnoDB - Innodb is a storage engine used in mysql table schemas and isn't really related to NoSQL key/value stores like Mongo, Redis or CouchDB. If you mean a comparison between the two, here is a basic benchmark on an update statement between mongo, a major NoSQL platform, and mysql tables using the InnoDB engine.

http://mysqlha.blogspot.com/2010/09/mysql-versus-mongodb-update-performance.html

That said, most of the NoSQL alternatives have at this point fairly stable libraries. An application my team worked on utilized memcached alongside mongo utilizing their Python APIs in a search app to store query data to train the search results on later. Basically memcached hashes were stored alongside query data and then called after a result set was picked by the user in order to refine the results for those works. Haven't had any problems with utilizing the two together and implementation was a snap.

Most NoSQL engines now use some serialized key-value data, commonly some variant on the JSON spec. This actually makes things generally even easier than the old RDBMS approach of constructing your objects from across multiple tables and running numerous updates for your persistence tier. In the case of Mongo, we handed the whole serialized BSON doc returned from Mongo to memcached for the temp storage and there were no chokes at all.

This NoSQL thing is pretty cool for those already working with the object paradigm.

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