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So I have this array, and I want to delete strings that are 2 or 4 characters in length (strings that contain 2 or 4 characters). I am doing this method, and it doesn't work, even though logically, it SHOULD work.

public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
    list.add("This");
    list.add("is");
    list.add("a");
    list.add("test");
    for (int i=0; i<list.size(); i++)
    {
        if(list.get(i).length()==2 || list.get(i).length()==4)
        {
            list.remove(i);  
        }

    }
}

I'd like to stick to this method of doing it. Can you please give me some suggestions as to how to correct this code?

The output of this code when I run it is:

 [is, a]

Even though I want the output to be

 [a]

because "is" is 2 characters long.

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The list is changing. Iterate from last element to first or use iterator.

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Yes, it worked! Thanks –  Macosx Iam Nov 17 '11 at 1:58
1  
well accept the answer then :-) although i prefer the use of iterator in this case as shown in bringer128's answer –  aishwarya Nov 17 '11 at 2:02
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PeterPeiGuo is right - you are removing elements which is shifting your index.

This is a prime candidate for an iterator.

Iterator<String> it = list.iterator();
while(it.hasNext()) {
  String val = it.next();
  if(val.length() == 4 || val.length() == 2) {
    it.remove();
  }
}
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Another option for it: When you remove one, decrease your index by 1. By the way, it works, but is not a good coding style.

for (int i=0; i<list.size(); i++)
{
    if(list.get(i).length()==2 || list.get(i).length()==4)
    {
        list.remove(i); 
        i--; 
    }
}
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Deleting things from the list changes the indexes of the remaining things in the list.

When your code runs, in the first iteration, i is 0 and it deletes the "this" entry at 0. On the second iteration i is 1 and thus it doesn't check the value at 0, which is now "is" because the "this" was removed.

As PeterPeiGui says in his answer, you can work around it in this particular case just by going backward, but traversing a collection and mutating it simultaneously always has a risk of introducing plenty of confusion.

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