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I am currently developing a small grading application (for a C++ course) that will compile students' .cpp files and compare the output to a master. I'm using QT Creator to develop the UI as well as the back-end component (including some SQLite integration), and I have struggled with finding a way to compile the files automatically and discretely.

I originally developed a small application in VS2010 that utilized the VS Command Line Compiler - it works, but only in debug mode (when the program is executed from within cmd.exe). When I moved to Release, the compile command ("cl") was not recognized. Here is a small code segment:

int main()
{
    system("vcvarsall.bat"); // To set up VS Command Prompt environment
    _putenv("INCLUDE=<my include paths>"); // Include paths for compilation
    _putenv("LIB=<my lib paths>"); // Include paths for linking
    system("cl /EHsc \"Student1.cpp"); // Compilation code
    return 0;
}

When executed in Release, both "cl" and "cl.exe" are not recognized as commands. I am executing a variant of this program as a .exe file from within the QT application, passing a file name to this function, so it needs to be in Release form. What can I do to utilize the Command Line Compiler from within this application?

Thanks!

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You need to find the "cl.exe" file in your environment. I believe its somewhere in VS folder –  Dani Nov 17 '11 at 1:57
    
Did you try fully-qualifying vcvarsall.bat? It's unlikely to be in your PATH... –  ildjarn Nov 17 '11 at 2:02
2  
if I was your student, I could do some NASTY things to your computer :) –  Keith Nicholas Nov 17 '11 at 2:11
    
@ildjarn and @Dani: I truncated my code so it would fit better. Here are the full lines: system("\"C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\\VC\\vcvarsall.bat\""); _putenv("INCLUDE=\"C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\\VC\\include\";\"C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\\VC\\bin\\\";"); _putenv("LIB=C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\\VC\\lib;C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Microsoft SDKs\\Windows\\v7.0A\\Lib"); –  confused.ben Nov 17 '11 at 2:12
    
@KeithNicholas: Ah, but I ran it in a sandbox and flunked you. :P –  GManNickG Nov 17 '11 at 2:21
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1 Answer 1

I have no teaching background, but my first suggestion is to have your students provide a makefile. NMake is system for VC, so you could try that.

If you still would like to compile using your own code I would recommend SCons instead of a console application. SCons and Python are free and very easy to setup. Your example becomes:

Program(target='Student1App', source=['Student1.cpp'])

You can call scons from within a C++ application if you choose, and after the call, assuming no build errors, the executable will be available.

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