Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is very basic, but I didn't find an answer on a Google search.

In Java, what is the maximum size a String object may have, referring to the length() method call?

I know that length() return the size of a String as a char [];

share|improve this question
1  
While the length of a String is theoretically Integer.MAX_VALUE, the length of a string literal in the source appears to be limited to only 65535 bytes of UTF-8 data. –  200_success Nov 13 '13 at 5:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 106 down vote accepted

Considering the String class' length method returns an int, the maximum length that would be returned by the method would be Integer.MAX_VALUE, which is 2^31 - 1 (or approximately 2 billion.)

In terms of lengths and indexing of arrays, (such as char[], which is probably the way the internal data representation is implemented for Strings), Chapter 10: Arrays of The Java Language Specification, Java SE 7 Edition says the following:

The variables contained in an array have no names; instead they are referenced by array access expressions that use nonnegative integer index values. These variables are called the components of the array. If an array has n components, we say n is the length of the array; the components of the array are referenced using integer indices from 0 to n - 1, inclusive.

Furthermore, the indexing must be by int values, as mentioned in Section 10.4:

Arrays must be indexed by int values;

Therefore, it appears that the limit is indeed 2^31 - 1, as that is the maximum value for a nonnegative int value.

However, there probably are going to be other limitations, such as the maximum allocatable size for an array.

share|improve this answer
16  
Integer.MAX_VALUE is 2^31-1, actually. :) –  Michael Myers May 3 '09 at 2:38
1  
Great answer man! I took a look on String.java source code and it's right, 'count' is the int variable who returns the length of the char array, and the char array is stored on the 'value' variable (as char [ ]) It means that the String size could be around 2GB. Of course there could be limitations to allocate such memory size. Thanks! –  taichi May 3 '09 at 3:45
4  
I just tried defining a string literal in a hello world java program which was longer than 65546. javac gives an error about that literal being too long: javac HelloWorld.java 2>&1|head -c 80 HelloWorld.java:3: constant string too long –  dlamblin Jul 15 '11 at 19:59
2  
@dlamblin: That sounds like a limitation of javac for String literals (not String objects), as I cannot find any reference to size limits to String literals in the Java Language Specification and JVM Specification. I tried making a String literal that was larger than 100,000 characters, and the Eclipse compiler didn't have a problem compiling it. (And running the program was able to show that the literal had a String.length larger than 100,000.) –  coobird Jul 16 '11 at 3:17
2  
@Premraj It was three years ago so I had to think about it. ;) What I meant was; to build a maximum sized string you need alot of memory, possibly more than you have anyway. You need two bytes per character ~ 4GB, but you need to build this from a StringBuilder or char[] which means you need another two bytes per character to create it in the first place, i.e. another ~ 4 GB (at least temporarily) –  Peter Lawrey May 25 '12 at 16:16

Since arrays must be indexed with integers, the maximum length of an array is Integer.MAX_INT (231-1, or 2 147 483 647). This is assuming you have enough memory to hold an array of that size, of course.

share|improve this answer

java.io.DataInput.readUTF() and java.io.DataOutput.writeUTF(String) say that a String object is represented by two bytes of length information and the modified UTF-8 representation of every character in the string. This concludes that the length of String is limited by the number of bytes of the modified UTF-8 representation of the string when used with DataInput and DataOutput.

In addition, The specification of CONSTANT_Utf8_info found in the Java virtual machine specification defines the structure as follows.

CONSTANT_Utf8_info {
    u1 tag;
    u2 length;
    u1 bytes[length];
}

You can find that the size of 'length' is two bytes.

That the return type of a certain method (e.g. String.length()) is int does not always mean that its allowed maximum value is Integer.MAX_VALUE. Instead, in most cases, int is chosen just for performance reasons. The Java language specification says that integers whose size is smaller than that of int are converted to int before calculation (if my memory serves me correctly) and it is one reason to choose int when there is no special reason.

The maximum length at compilation time is at most 65536. Note again that the length is the number of bytes of the modified UTF-8 representation, not the number of characters in a String object.

String objects may be able to have much more characters at runtime. However, if you want to use String objects with DataInput and DataOutput interfaces, it is better to avoid using too long String objects. I found this limitation when I implemented Objective-C equivalents of DataInput.readUTF() and DataOutput.writeUTF(String).

share|improve this answer

apparently it's bound to an int, which is 0x7FFFFFFF (2147483647).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.