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I have a library which exposes callback functions, and needs to be called from both managed and native code. I implemented this by doing:

typedef struct { DWORD blah; } MY_STRUCT;

class ICallbackInterface
{
public:
    virtual HRESULT CallbackFunc1(const MY_STRUCT* pStruct) { return S_OK; }

    // helper for overriding the vtable (used later on by the managed code)
    class VTable
    {
    public:
        void* pfnCallbackFunc1;
    };
};

The native code receives a pointer to an ICallbackInterface, and calls CallbackFunc1.

In C++/CLI code, I'm allocating an ICallbackInterface, and overriding its vtable to point to delegates of the managed functions I want to call. (The following snippet is from the constructor):

public ref class MyManagedClass
{
...
        m_pCallbackClass = new ICallbackInterface;

        if (!m_pCallbackClass) 
            return E_OUTOFMEMORY;

        m_pNewCallbackVtable = new ICallbackInterface::VTable;

        if (!m_pNewCallbackVtable)
        {
            delete m_pCallbackClass;
            m_pCallbackClass = nullptr;

            return E_OUTOFMEMORY;
        }

        // Get the (hidden) pointer to the vtable

        ICallbackInterface::VTable** ppAddressOfInternalVtablePointer = 
            (ICallbackInterface::VTable**)m_pCallbackClass;

        ICallbackInterface::VTable* pOldVtable = *ppAddressOfInternalVtablePointer;

        // Copy all the functions from the old vtable that we don't want to override

        *m_pNewCallbackVtable = *pOldVtable;

        // Manually override the vtable entries with our delegate functions

        m_pNewCallbackVtable->pfnCallbackFunc1 = Marshal::GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(gcnew delCallbackFunc1(this, &MyManagedClass::CallbackFunc1)).ToPointer();
...

And here's the callback function & its delegate

    [UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention::StdCall)] 
    delegate HRESULT delCallbackFunc1(const MY_STRUCT* pMyStruct);
    HRESULT CallbackFunc1(const MY_STRUCT* pMyStruct)
    {
        // do something with pMyStruct.
    }
}

When I compile the native library for x86, all works well. (I don't know why CallingConvention::StdCall is used there, but the alternatives seem to cause problems with esp.)

When I compile it for x64, the callback function gets called, and rsp is fine when I return, but pMyStruct is trashed. It appears the native code likes to pass things in to rdx, but somewhere in the native->managed transition (which the debugger won't let me step into), rdx is being filled with garbage.

Is there some attribute I can use to on my delegate to fix this on x64? Or do I need to do something less pleasant like wrap my entire managed class in a native class to do the callbacks? Or did I just find a managed codegen bug?

share|improve this question

you're invoking undefined bwhavior left and right, and relying on implementation details such as vtable layout and virtual member function calling convention. it's no wonder that things broke when you changed platforms.

you need to write derived vl lass if the native interface. the implementation can call function pointers or managed delegates directly. and stop messing with the vtsble pointer.

share|improve this answer

Found the problem. The managed code has its "this" pointer that comes when initializing the delegate. But the native function has its own "this" pointer which is being passed along too. Changing the managed signatures to the following totally fixes the bug, and now the function gets access to both "this" pointers.

[UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention::ThisCall)]  
delegate HRESULT delCallbackFunc1(ICallbackInterface* NativeThis, const MY_STRUCT* pMyStruct); 
HRESULT CallbackFunc1(ICallbackInterface* NativeThis, const MY_STRUCT* pMyStruct) 
{ 
    // do something with pMyStruct. 
} 

This works on x86 and x64.

share|improve this answer

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