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This loop leaks memory:

int64_t i,verylongnumber;

//misc. code

for(i=0;i<verylongnumber;i++){
    NSMutableArray *myArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithObjects:
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            nil];
    [myArray removeAllObjects];
    [myArray release];
}

I've tried everything to keep it from leaking memory, but I can't. I think it has something to do with the NSNumbers. I assume they are created autoreleased, but does that mean I have to free them individually (i.e. use alloc)? How would I even do that? Create a separate variable for each NSNumber and insert that into the array? That seems like a lot of work. I tried [myArray removeAllObjects], but that made no difference. it is within my own thread with its own autorelease pool. I'm not sure if that makes a difference.

This fixed it:

I added an additional autorelease pool inside the loop:

int64_t i,verylongnumber;

//misc. code

for(i=0;i<verylongnumber;i++){

    NSAutoreleasePool *pool2 = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    NSMutableArray *myArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithObjects:
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:65535],
            nil];
    [myArray release];

    [pool2 drain];
}
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You may want to look into the @autoreleasepool statement, which is supported under both ARC and MRC and is faster than NSAutoreleasePool (and one fewer step in the ARC conversion when you get to that point). –  Peter Hosey Nov 17 '11 at 8:03
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'll take a stab at this..

You can remove [myArray removeAllObjects] as it is redundant. NSArray's do retain their objects, but they also release them when the array itself is deallocated.

The NSNumbers themselves are autoreleased. However if you do a very very large loop then that autoreleased memory won't actually be freed until the for loop exits and eventually the run loop as well (unless you have setup a separate NSAutoreleasePool somewhere).

So I can see how the memory usage would increase as this loop iterates, but at completion it should free the memory. How did you arrive at the conclusion that you have a leak?

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Thanks. I just added another autorelease pool inside the loop and that seemed to fix the problem. –  Synthetix Nov 17 '11 at 3:48
    
I'm glad that worked. If you're satisfied with my answer, I'd appreciate it if you accepted it. –  Carter Nov 17 '11 at 11:59
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Are you waiting to see if the objects get released in the near future?

Autoreleased objects are released at some point in the near future. In the case above, you're looping a very long number of times creating many objects. They will not get released within the scope of that code.

In a GUI app it means after the function returns when the run loop is being run. In a console app, it's when the pool is released.

Check out:

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/MemoryMgmt/Articles/mmAutoreleasePools.html

Autorelease pools provide a mechanism whereby you can send an object a “deferred” release message.

The key is the deferred point.

EDIT: (after comment)

Note that you can drain the pool. The other option is to create non-autoreleased numbers (alloc/init) and explicitly release in your long running loop. depending on the code, that may be desirable since draining the pool could release objects deferred for release which code later in that loop/scope assumes is still deferred. If you want to control it, then control it.

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They need to be released on each loop iteration, because the loop will be running for a long time. Even small amounts of memory build up over time to the point where the app's memory usage is massive. –  Synthetix Nov 17 '11 at 3:56
    
OK - as the auto release pool docs noted, you can drain it. Your other option is to create (alloc, init, copy) the numbers and then explictly release them. That gives you explicit control of exactly what you want to release in that loop (could be gui) without inadvertantly draining other items deferred for release. –  bryanmac Nov 17 '11 at 4:01
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NSArray retains objects when they're added to NSArray. This means that NSArray takes ownership of that object. when the object is removed from NSArray or NSArray destroyed, the object is released (reference count -1). If object dont have any other owner then object is destroyed.
The following code will create memory leak

NSNumber *number = [[NSNumber alloc]initWithFloat:floatValue]; //reference count is 1, you are the owner
[aArray addObject:number] //reference count is 2, aArray is also owner.  

So to remove memory leak , you shoul release number.

 NSNumber *number = [[NSNumber alloc]initWithFloat:floatValue]; //reference count is 1, you are the owner
[aArray addObject:number] //reference count is 2, aArray is also owner. 
[number release]; // reference count is 1, you are not owner og number    

If you are adding autorelease object to NSArray, no need to release that object. when the autorelease pool is popped that object will loose its ownership.
In your example with each for loop, NSNumber is created while the old one is still hanging around in memory waiting for the autorelease pool to be released.

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