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I have a data.frame and some columns have NA values. I want to replace the NAs with zeros. How I do this?

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7  
small modification of stackoverflow.com/questions/7279089/… (which I found by searching "[r] replace NA with zero") ... –  Ben Bolker Nov 17 '11 at 4:16
3  
please search... there are lots of questions like this that can be adapted for the answer –  John Nov 17 '11 at 4:42
    
@BenBolker Look at my comment at aL3xa answer. –  Renato Dinhani Conceição Nov 17 '11 at 14:12
    
@John Look at my comment at aL3xa answer –  Renato Dinhani Conceição Nov 17 '11 at 14:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 164 down vote accepted

See my comment in @gsk3 answer. A simple example:

> m <- matrix(sample(c(NA, 1:10), 100, replace = TRUE), 10)
> d <- as.data.frame(m)
   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10
1   4  3 NA  3  7  6  6 10  6   5
2   9  8  9  5 10 NA  2  1  7   2
3   1  1  6  3  6 NA  1  4  1   6
4  NA  4 NA  7 10  2 NA  4  1   8
5   1  2  4 NA  2  6  2  6  7   4
6  NA  3 NA NA 10  2  1 10  8   4
7   4  4  9 10  9  8  9  4 10  NA
8   5  8  3  2  1  4  5  9  4   7
9   3  9 10  1  9  9 10  5  3   3
10  4  2  2  5 NA  9  7  2  5   5

> d[is.na(d)] <- 0

> d
   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10
1   4  3  0  3  7  6  6 10  6   5
2   9  8  9  5 10  0  2  1  7   2
3   1  1  6  3  6  0  1  4  1   6
4   0  4  0  7 10  2  0  4  1   8
5   1  2  4  0  2  6  2  6  7   4
6   0  3  0  0 10  2  1 10  8   4
7   4  4  9 10  9  8  9  4 10   0
8   5  8  3  2  1  4  5  9  4   7
9   3  9 10  1  9  9 10  5  3   3
10  4  2  2  5  0  9  7  2  5   5

There's no need to apply apply. =)

EDIT

You should also take a look at norm package. It has a lot of nice features for missing data analysis. =)

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1  
I already tried this code yesterday before you post it and not worked. Because this I posted the question. But I tried know and worked perfectly. I think I was doing something wrong. –  Renato Dinhani Conceição Nov 17 '11 at 14:08
    
Maybe the object was of the wrong class... who knows... O_o –  aL3xa Nov 17 '11 at 16:17
7  
@RenatoDinhaniConceição: if you tried something already, it's helpful to share that information when you ask the question; it helps to narrow down where the problem may be. –  Aaron Nov 17 '11 at 19:33
    
d[is.na(d)] <- 0 does not make sense to me. It seems backwards? How does R process this statement? –  user798719 Apr 4 at 11:03

For a single vector:

x <- c(1,2,NA,4,5)
x[is.na(x)] <- 0

For a data.frame, make a function out of the above, then apply it to the columns.

Please provide a reproducible example next time as detailed here:

How to make a great R reproducible example?

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8  
is.na is generic function, and has methods for objects of data.frame class. so this one will also work on data.frames! –  aL3xa Nov 17 '11 at 11:44
    
@aL3xa Good point! –  Ari B. Friedman Nov 17 '11 at 12:06
1  
When I ran methods(is.na) for the first time, I was like whaaa?!?. I love when stuff like that happen! =) –  aL3xa Nov 17 '11 at 16:15
3  
Suppose you have a data frame named df instead of a single vector and you just want to replace missing observations in a single column named X3. You can do so with this line: df$X3[is.na(df$X3)] <- 0 –  Mark Miller Feb 22 '13 at 1:25
2  
Suppose you only want to replace NA with 0 in columns 4-6 of a data frame named my.df. You can use: my.df[,4:6][is.na(my.df[,4:6])] <- 0 –  Mark Miller Mar 20 '13 at 2:27

if you're trying to replace NAs when writing to csv, you can use:

  write.csv(data,"data.csv",na="0")
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dplyr example:

require(dplyr)
df <- df %>%
      mutate(colname = ifelse(is.na(colname),0,colname))
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When I enter this today, I get a warming message: %.% is deprecated. Please use %>% –  mcduffee Oct 30 '14 at 21:57

You can use replace()

For example:

> x <- c(-1,0,1,0,NA,0,1,1)
> x1 <- replace(x,5,1)
> x1
[1] -1  0  1  0  1  0  1  1

> x1 <- replace(x,5,mean(x,na.rm=T))
> x1
[1] -1.00  0.00  1.00  0.00  0.29  0.00 1.00  1.00
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3  
True, but only practical when you know the index of NAs in your vector. It's fine for small vectors as in your example. –  dardisco Apr 8 '13 at 1:43

Function na.omit() is useful in some similar cases too. When you have vector with NA's you can just close it with this function.

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Although na.omit() is a useful function, please edit your answer to explain how it helps to replace all instances of NA with 0. As it stands, your post does not answer the question. –  BenBarnes Apr 13 at 6:23

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