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How to iterate through an array starting from the last element? (Ruby)

I am trying to iterate over a list in reverse, but I have not been able to figure it out.

Here is my code:

#!/usr/bin/ruby
presidents = ["Ford", "Carter", "Reagan", "Bush1", "Clinton", "Bush2"]

for ss in -presidents.length...0
    print  ": ", presidents[ss], "\n";
end
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marked as duplicate by Adam Harte, mu is too short, Andrew Grimm, Samuel Liew, cpx Nov 17 '11 at 11:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

use reverse_each

presidents = ["Ford", "Carter", "Reagan", "Bush1", "Clinton", "Bush2"]
presidents.reverse_each { |president| p president }
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oh, I prefer your method to mine –  marflar Nov 17 '11 at 4:12
presidents = ["Ford", "Carter", "Reagan", "Bush1", "Clinton", "Bush2"]

presidents.reverse.each do |president|
  puts president
end
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1  
thank you very much –  Kishore Babu Jetty Nov 17 '11 at 4:15
    
nash's solution is better –  marflar Nov 17 '11 at 4:16
    
reverse.each makes a copy of the array. You should use reverse_each –  Adam Harte Nov 17 '11 at 4:17
    
if I wanna do the same with array contains numbers .can I apply the same –  Kishore Babu Jetty Nov 17 '11 at 4:24
    
@AdamHarte thanks for the tip. Kishore, you can do this with numbers too. But you should know that there is a difference between numbers = [1, 2, 3] and numbers = ["1", "2", "3"]. In the first array, numbers are Integers and in the second, they are Strings. –  marflar Nov 17 '11 at 4:27

Here is another way

(presidents.length-1).step(0,-1) {|i| p presidents[i]}
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