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Got a simple question regarding whether to use generics or not and if yes, is this the right way?

The normal non-generic version is as below:

    public interface IFood
{
    string name { get; set; }
}

public class Vegetables : IFood
{
    #region IFood Members

    public string name
    {
        get { return "Cabbage"; }
        set{ }
    }

    #endregion
}

public class Cow
{
    private IFood _food;

    public Cow(IFood food)
    {
        _food = food;
    }

    public string Eat()
    {
        return "I am eating " + _food.name;
    }
}

The generic version is as below:

    public class Cow<T> where T : IFood
{
    private T _food;
    public Cow(T food)
    {
        _food = food
    }

    public string Eat()
    {
        return "I am eating " + _food.name;
    }
}

Am I doing everything right in generic version? Is it necessary to use Generic version for future growth? This is just the simple mock up of the original scenario but it resembles completely.

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5  
Do you need to have a Cow<Grain> class that is completely separate from Cow<Corn>? Or can a given Cow be fed grain, corn, or whatever other fluff that passes for animal feed these days? Your cows in the generic version are not the same thing, no more than a List<int> is the same as a List<string>. On the other hand, to me, a cow is a cow. –  Anthony Pegram Nov 17 '11 at 4:52
    
@AnthonyPegram: That should be an answer –  Dani Nov 17 '11 at 4:57
    
    
@AnthonyPegram So you don't recommend using the Generic version just because Cow<Grain> is different than Cow<Corn>. Can you explain it in brief with a proper example and in the answer section because I wanted to mark it as answer, but cudn't do so in comment section –  DotNetInfo Nov 17 '11 at 5:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think its a bad idea in this specific example.

A List<int> is often described as List of int. A Cow<IFood> is harder to describe - it certainly isn't a Cow of IFood. This isn't a slam dunk argument, but shows a potential problem.

MSDN states:

Use generic types to maximize code reuse, type safety, and performance.

In your example, the generic version has no more code reuse, no more type safety and no improved performance.

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I think it's a very very bad idea to use generics to enforce behavior rules. If you only want a cow to be able to eat vegetables, then that is more logic, and should be enforced by logical rules rather than trying to get the compiler to enforce it. Thus the cow should accept all foods, and then application logic determines what to do if you gave it something besides what it can eat.

A really good example of this is if you decide to add Hay as something that the cow can eat, there is no way to use generics to say that you can give the cow Vegetables or Hay, unless you create an IVegetableOrHay interface, which should make us all want to just kill that cow and eat it for dinner.

Compiler type enforcement is for ensuring proper program structure. Application logic belongs as code.

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You want to extend/ implement subclasses feature using generic? Then this is not purpose of Generic. You will use generic where all types of objects have same purpose to meet. Like serialization. Here if you make COW generic then you have to implement subclass of COW feature inside COW. which will not be refuse bequest for another subclass. Here COW could be super class instead of generic. my advice to use generic for different family of classes. Not within same family of classes.

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