Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm confused about the best practices of VHDL - like when to use integer or real or signal or std_logic_vector. I'm in a computer organization class and we're implementing it using mostly block diagrams in Quartus, with a little VHDL. The problem is, our whole project is just scattered and bug-prone and it's been a pain getting it this far.

I think it would make so much more sense in VHDL, and I've written a few components, but we didn't learn much VHDL in class, and google isn't providing many good tutorials. I also googled for VHDL MIPS processor implementations/tutorials, but to no avail.

This is a vague question, but I just need a push in the right directions. Three questions I can ask now:

  1. How do I connect all my components in VHDL (register file, apu, memory, ...)?
  2. When do I use integer/real/std_logic?
  3. I've seen some VHDL code that has specified delay before a value is output. When should I do this in a MIPS datapath?

EDIT: Along with the answer already given, I'd like to recommend http://www.fpga.com.cn/hdl/training/Vhdl_Golden_Reference_Guide.pdf, which explains everything so well. Without that tutorial, I would have had to buy a book, because piecing the language together by reading bits of code does not work.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
I also googled for VHDL MIPS processor implementations/tutorials, but to no avail

There are quite a few MIPS cores written in VHDL in the public domain. You may look at them to get some ideas...

I've successfully used the first one in a couple of projects.

share|improve this answer
add comment
  1. You connect them with signals -- i.e., you declare a signal, then you hook up the signal to the output of one component, and the input of another -- its just like a wire (or many wires in the case of std_logic_vector or integer etc).

  2. You can do everything in std_logic if you want to, just as you could write all programs in assembler code. For non-synthesizable VHDL (i.e., test benches and such) you can use real and integer as much as you like. For synthesizable VHDL, you can use integer and let the VHDL compiler infer the underlying representation in terms of std_logic -- if you start doing this, make sure you inspect the output of the compiler to see how it has represented the integers (e.g., it may have used std_logic_vector(31 downto 0) for an integer than only has range of 0 to 7 -- in that case you need to help the compiler infer the correct underlying std_logic_vector). As for real -- thats probably best left for non-synthesizable VHDL, and you can use the floating point types in VHDL 2008 for synthesizable real numbers.

  3. You can design a MIPS datapath without specifying any delays. If you don't know why you need them, don't use them. When you get to synthesis, the design might have really bad timing characteristics (i.e., only runs at a few hundred kHz) -- you can then go back and start pipelining the design. But as I said, probably best to start off easy, and forget about the timing for now -- just get the design working and synthesizing, then start to work on the timing stuff.

If you are looking for a good book on the subject, I recommend "Digital design and computer architecture", by David Harris and Sarah Harris

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm confused about the best practices of VHDL - like when to use integer or real or signal or std_logic_vector.

You can't use reals for synthesis (ie, not for anything that ends up in a real chip)

Use integer or signed or unsigned when you need to do arithmetic on the values. Use std_logic[_vector] only when you need port pins which can go high-impedance. Use std_ulogic[_vector] when you need single bit or "bag-of-bits" internally. The advantage of std_ulogic is that only one thing can drive the signal by definition, so if you make a mess and drive it from two places, the compiler will tell you. Otherwise you have a simulation full of Xs on the waveform viewer and no idea where they came from.

signals are used to communicate values between different functional blocks (either entity blocks or process blocks). variables are used within processes to keep track of things.

How do I connect all my components in VHDL (register file, apu, memory, ...)?

With signals. Sigasi's editor makes this much easier (less boilerplate typing)

Don't create components - you have the entity already, use direct instantiation:

ALU1 : entity work.alu port map (
   clk => clk,
   etc...
);

VHDL code that has specified delay before a value is output. When should I do this in a MIPS datapath?

You don't want to specify delays - they are ignored in synthesis, and if your design is fully synchronous (everything is a clocked process with a single clock going everywhere) the compiler will sort out the real delays for you later, you can abstract yourself above this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.