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I have read that, when using react, all actors can execute in a single thread. I often process a collection in parallel and need to output the result. I do not believe System.out.println is threadsafe so I need some protection. One way (a traditional way) I could do this:

val lock = new Object
def printer(msg: Any) {
  lock.synchronized {
    println(msg)
  }
}

(1 until 1000).par.foreach { i =>
  printer(i)
}

println("done.")

How does this first solution compare to using actors in terms of efficiency? Is it true that I'm not creating a new thread?

val printer = actor {
  loop {
    react {
      case msg => println(msg)
    }
  }
}

(1 until 10000).par.foreach { i =>
  printer ! i
}

println("done.")

It doesn't seem to be a good alternative however, because the actor code never completes. If I put a println at the bottom it is never hit, even though it looks like it goes through every iteration for i. What am I doing wrong?

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Sometimes the Scala terminal will act funny and "hang" even though execution is done. Not exactly sure why, but you have to press enter after all the values are printed out. –  Sean Nilan Nov 17 '11 at 8:20
    
I would expect that a println("done.") stuck at the very end would eventually be shown, but it isn't (2.9.1.r0-b20110831114755). –  schmmd Nov 17 '11 at 16:50
    
it seems as though "done" is being printed, just before most of the numbers are printed. try running from (1 until 10) and you should get the same result. as to the why of this behavior, actors are asynchronous. the messages are sent, the loop exits, and before all of the messages are processed by the actor, the remainder of the program finishes. –  Sean Nilan Nov 17 '11 at 19:59
    
Doh! That's exactly it. –  schmmd Nov 17 '11 at 20:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you have it now with your Actor code, you only have one actor doing all the printing. As you can see from running the code, the values are all printed out sequentially by the Actor whereas in the parallel collection code, they're out of order. I'm not too familiar with parallel collections, so I don't know the performance gains between the two.

However, if your code is doing a lot of work in parallel, you probably would want to go with multiple actors. You could do something like this:

def printer = actor {
  loop {
    react {
      case msg => println(msg)
    }
  }
}

val num_workers = 10
val worker_bees = Vector.fill(num_workers)(printer)

(1 until 1000).foreach { i =>
    worker_bees(i % num_workers) ! i
}

The def is important. This way you're actually creating multiple actors and not just flooding one.

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Thanks for the reminder of the order difference with actors. –  schmmd Nov 17 '11 at 16:53

One actor instance will never process more than one message at the time. Whatever thread pool is allocated for the actors, each actor instance will only occupy one thread at the time, so you are guaranteed that all the printing will be processed serially.

As for not finishing, the execution of an actor never returns from a react or a loop, so:

val printer = actor {
  loop {
    react {
      case msg => println(msg)
    }
    // This line is never reached because of react
  }
  // This line is never reached because of loop
}

If you replace loop and react with a while loop and receive, you'll see that everything inside the while loop executes as expected.

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To fix your actor implementation you need to tell the actor to exit before the program will exit as well.

val printer = actor {
  loop {
    react {
      case "stop" => exit()
      case msg => println(msg)
    }
  }
}

(1 until 1000).par.foreach { printer ! _ }

printer ! "stop"

In both your examples there are thread pools involved backing both the parallels library and the actor library but they are created as needed.

However, println is thread safe as it does indeed have a lock in it's internals.

(1 until 1000).par.foreach { println(_) } // is threadsafe

As for performance, there are many factors. The first is that moving from a lock that multiple threads are contending for to a lock being used by only one thread ( one actor ) will increase performance. Second, if you are going to use actors and want performance, use Akka. Akka actors are blazingly fast when compared to scala actors. Also, I hope that the stdout that println is writing to is going to a file and not the screen since involving the display drivers is going to kill your performance.

Using the parallels library is wonderful for performance since so you can take advantage of multiple cores for your computation. If each computation is very small then try the actor route for centralized reporting. However if each computation is significant and takes a decent amount of cpu time then stick just using println by itself. You really are not in a contended lock situation.

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I think you want to use val instead of def in this case, otherwise you're telling a newly created actor to stop. –  Sean Nilan Nov 17 '11 at 9:38
    
@Neil, thanks for the excellent answer. So my actor in my original example is running in its own thread? What lock does the actor manage? The stop message was the reason my application did not terminate, but it's odd that without it the trailing println("done.") (updated in my answer) is never shown. –  schmmd Nov 17 '11 at 17:03

I'm not sure I can understand your problem correctly. For me your actor code works fine and terminates.

Nevertheless, you can savely use println for parallel collections, so all you really need is something like this:

(1 until 1000).par.foreach { println(_) }

Works like a charm here. I assume you already know that the output order will vary, but I just want to stress it again, because the question comes up ever so often. So don't expect the numbers to scroll down your screen in a successive fashion.

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Do you know if you are guarenteed that two message will never print over each other? I had the experience somewhere (who knows where) that parallel printlns would sometimes be interspersed mid-string (I understand the strings may alternate, but the characters from different strings shouldn't be interspersed). In other words, I'm not sure if OutputStream is threadsafe. –  schmmd Nov 17 '11 at 16:52
    
@Neil claims that println has a lock in its internals. –  schmmd Nov 17 '11 at 17:04

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