Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What is a regex to match the word call or CALL in the following string in C#?

NIFTY-CALL-1200-Aug11
NIFTY CALL 1200 Aug11
NIFTYCALL-CALL-1200-Aug11 //In this case second call word must be matched not NIFTYCALL.
NIFTYCALL CALL 1200 Aug11 //In this case second call word must be matched not NIFTYCALL.
CALLNIFTY CALL 1200 Aug11 //In this case second call word must be matched not CALLNIFTY.
CALLNIFTY CALL 1200 Aug11 //In this case second call word must be matched not CALLNIFTY.
CALLNIFTY Aug11 1200CALL //In this case last call word must be matched not CALLNIFTY.
CALLNIFTY 1200 Aug11CALL //In this case last call word must be matched not CALLNIFTY.
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about

Regex regexObj = new Regex(@"(?:\b|[0-9])(CALL)\b", RegexOptions.Singleline);
  • the (?:<b|[0-9]) part checks for a word boundary or a number preceding CALL

  • (CALL) finds the string and puts it in a matching group

  • the \b part again checks for a word boundary.

share|improve this answer
    
,It works great.Thank you.But I don't understand the first part properly for word boundry (?:<b|[0-9]). – Harikrishna Nov 17 '11 at 7:39
    
@Harikrishna - the \b is a word boundary, the | is equivalent to an or statement, the [0-9] is a digit (the same as \d as Pengyu used). All this is wrapped into a none capturing group (?:....). – Lieven Keersmaekers Nov 17 '11 at 7:57

It would be

Regex re = new Regex(@"(\d|\b)(CALL|call)(\d|\b)");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I forgot about the \d. – Lieven Keersmaekers Nov 17 '11 at 7:59

Could also use

Regex re = new Regex(@"(\d|\b)(CALL)(\d|\b)",RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

instead of using CALL|call. That way, you'd also match "cAll" or "CALl". (If needed of course).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.