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I have got this part from a perl plugin.But I dont understand what does it do?Is it an array of associative arrays?If so then shouldnt it be started wuth @?Can anyone shed some light on this issue?

my $arguments =
  [ { 'name' => "process_exp",
    'desc' => "{BasePlugin.process_exp}",
    'type' => "regexp",
    'deft' => &get_default_process_exp(),
    'reqd' => "no" },
  { 'name' => "assoc_images",
    'desc' => "{MP4Plugin.assoc_images}",
    'type' => "flag",
    'deft' => "",
    'reqd' => "no" },
  { 'name' => "applet_metadata",
    'desc' => "{MP4Plugin.applet_metadata}",
    'type' => "flag",
    'deft' => "" },
  { 'name' => "metadata_fields",
    'desc' => "{MP4Plugin.metadata_fields}",
    'type' => "string",
    'deft' => "Title,Artist,Genre" },
  { 'name' => "file_rename_method",
    'desc' => "{BasePlugin.file_rename_method}",
    'type' => "enum",
    'deft' => &get_default_file_rename_method(), # by default rename imported files and assoc files using this encoding
    'list' => $BasePlugin::file_rename_method_list,
    'reqd' => "no"
  } ];
share|improve this question
9  
it's a reference to an array of hash references –  Bwmat Nov 17 '11 at 8:00
    
"hash references" is just the basic Perl structure, I see that and think that it is an array of records with named fields. They might even be blessed into a class at some point bless( $_, 'SomeClass' ) foreach @$arguments –  Axeman Nov 17 '11 at 13:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As Bwmat said it's a reference to an Array of Hash references. Read

$ man perlref

or

$ man perlreftut     # this is a bit more straightforward

for if you want to know more about references.

By the way in fiew words in Perl you can do:

@array = ( 1, 2 );          # declare an array
$array_reference = \@array; # take the reference to that array
$array_reference->[0] = 2;  # overwrite 1st position of @array

$numbers = [ 3, 4 ];        # this is another valid array ref declaration. Note [ ] instead of ( )

the same thing happens with hashes.

By the way in fiew words in Perl you can do:

%hash = ( foo => 1, bar => 2 );
$hash_reference = \%hash; 
$hash_reference->{foo} = 2;

$langs = { perl => 'cool', php => 'ugly' }; # this is another valid hash ref declaration. Note { } instead of ( )

And... yes, you can dereference these references.

%{ $hash_reference }

will be treated as it was a hash, so if you want to print the keys of $langs above, you can do:

print $_, "\n" foreach ( keys %{ $langs } );

To dereference an array ref use @{ } instead of %{ }. Even sub can be dereferenced.

sub foo
{
  print "hello world\n";
}

my %hash = ( call => \&foo );

&{ $hash{call} }; # this allows you to call the sub foo
share|improve this answer

$arguments is an array reference (a reference/pointer to an array)

You initialize arrays with () and array references with []

my @array = ( 1, 2, 3 );
my $array_ref = [ 1, 2, 3 ];

You can create a reference with \

my $other_array_ref = \@array;

When you use an array reference you will then to dereference it when using:

for my $element ( @{$array_ref} )

or

print ${$array_ref}[0];

See man perlref

Back to your question: $arguments is a reference to an array of hash references (initialized with {})

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Looks like a hash of hashes reference.

you may need to dereference like

%newhash = %{$arguments}

and print the data as

print $newhash{'name'}

share|improve this answer
    
Can't coerce array into hash with strict and warnings. –  flesk Nov 17 '11 at 8:39
1  
An array of hash references, surely? Or, more accurately, a reference to an array of hash references. –  Dave Cross Nov 17 '11 at 10:29

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