Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class with a method in which a string will be passed. That method will do some things to that string and it then passes the string to a certain object which can do other things with the string.

So it basically looks like this:

class Main
{
     public Main()
     {
         strClass str = new strClass(this);
     }

     public function handler ( )
     {
         console.log("No string is passed yet, but this method is called from receiveData()");
     }
}

class strClass
{
    object handler;
    public strClass ( handler )
    {
        // save the object
        this.handler = handler;
    }

    public receiveData ( string str )
    {
        // This method does some stuff with the string
        // And it then passes it on to the supplied object (handler) which will do
        // the rest of the processing

        // I'm calling the "handler" method in the object which got passed in the 
        // constructor
        Type thisType = this.handler.GetType();
        MethodInfo theMethod = thisType.GetMethod("handler");
        theMethod.Invoke(this.handler, null);
   }
}

Now this code works good, with the reflection stuff. But i was wondering, shouldn't this be possible (and maybe even better?) with delegates?? If so, how can i implement this by using a delegate instead?

share|improve this question
3  
the compiler errors make it a little hard to make sure we're answering the same question here... it would be good if it ran (since it "works good") –  Marc Gravell Nov 17 '11 at 8:15
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A delegate is a better option here.

class Main
{

     public Main()
     {
         StrClass str = new StrClass(this.Handler);
     }

     public void Handler ( )
     {
         //called from recieve data
     }
}

class StrClass
{
    readonly Action _handler;
    public StrClass ( Action callback)
    {
        // save the object
        this._handler = callback;
    }

    public void receiveData( string str )
    {
        this._handler();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works great and seems to be a much better solution then what i had. –  w00 Nov 17 '11 at 8:37
add comment

Couldn't you use interfaces instead:

 interface IStringHandler {
     void HandleString(string s);
 }


 class strClass 
 {
      IStringHandler handler = null;

      public strClass(IStringHandler handler)
      {
          this.handler = handler;
      }

      public void ReceiveData(string s)
      {
          handler.HandleString(s);
      }
 }


 class Main : IStringHandler
 {
      // Your code
 }
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do it with an Action like this:

class Main 
{
    public Main()      
    {
        strClass str = new strClass(newString => 
        {
             console.log("This string I got back: " + newString);      
        });
    } 
 }  
 class strClass 
 {     
    Action<string> callback;
    public strClass (Action<string> callback) 
    { 
        // save the action
        this.callback = callback;     
    }
    public receiveData ( string str )     
    {
        // Do something with the string
        callback(str);
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
add comment

Even nicer than using delegates whould be using the Chain of Responsibility design pattern, which does exactly what you need :).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Firstly, if you must call an unknown method by name, use dynamic - it is heavily optimised for this (although still not a great idea):

((dynamic)handler).handler(); // but please don't use this! see below

However, I would instead look at either an Action<string> (or maybe Func<string,string>), or an interface with a known method on it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Basically, you want to change how your StrClass object react to data begin received. Sounds like events to me.

something like this, where you have handling methods both in the Main and in a generic HandlerObject:

class StrClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged = null;
    public void OnPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
            PropertyChanged(this, e);
    }

    private string receivedString;
    public string ReceivedString
    {
        get;
        set
        {
            string oldStr = receivedString;
            receivedString = value;
            PropertyChanged(receivedString, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("ReceivedString"));
        }
    }

    public void receiveData(string str)
    {
        //event fires here
        ReceivedString = str;
    }
}

class HandlerObject
{
    public void HandlerMethod1(string s)
    {
        //magic
    }

    public void HandlerMethod2(string s)
    {
        //different kind of magic
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void HandlerMethod3(string s)
    {
        //another kind of magic!
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        StrClass class1 = new StrClass();
        StrClass class2 = new StrClass();
        StrClass class3 = new StrClass();

        HandlerObject handler = new HandlerObject();

        class1.PropertyChanged += (s, e) => { handler.HandlerMethod1(s.ToString()); };
        class2.PropertyChanged += (s, e) => { handler.HandlerMethod2(s.ToString()); };
        class3.PropertyChanged += (s, e) => { HandlerMethod3(s.ToString()); };
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.