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Here's a bit of code which prints out the squares of the numbers from 0 to 9:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    Console.WriteLine(i*i);

Doing something from 0 to N by 1 via a for loop is a very common idiom.

Here's an UpTo method which expresses this:

class MathUtil
{
    public static void UpTo(int n, Action<int> proc)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            proc(i);
    }
}

The squares example above is now:

MathUtil.UpTo(10, (i) => Console.WriteLine(i * i));

My question is, does the standard C# library come with something like the above UpTo?

Ideally, I'd like a way to have 'UpTo' be a method on all integer objects. So I could do:

var n = 10;

n.UpTo(...);

Is this possible in C#?

share|improve this question
13  
It might be a matter of taste, but I consider the for variant to be a bit more readable than UpTo. In addition, it's extremely easy to modify the start number (0) or the incrementation method (i++) in the for variant. I think Eric Lippert's comments on a ForEach method apply here as well. –  Heinzi Nov 17 '11 at 8:22
1  
@Heinzi Thanks for the link to Eric's article! –  dharmatech Nov 17 '11 at 8:43
1  
.NET Extensions Methods(dnpextensions.codeplex.com) have an extension method for this. 5.times(...); –  Jalal Nov 22 '11 at 17:16
3  
This just made me think of the excellent article on the new 'goes to' (-->)and 'is approached by' (<--) operators, that were introduced in C# 4.0 - see Eric Lippert's blog for more details: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/04/01/… –  yas4891 Nov 22 '11 at 17:53
    
@yas4891: Funny stuff :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 22 '11 at 22:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Turn it into an extension method (note the this before the n parameter, which defines the type this method operates on):

static class MathUtil
{
    public static void UpTo(this int n, Action<int> proc)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            proc(i);
    }
}

Usage:

10.UpTo((i) => Console.WriteLine(i * i));

Note: The above method call isn't particularly intuitive though. Remember code is written once and read many times.

Maybe allowing something like below might be slightly better, but to be honest i'd still just write a foreach loop.

0.UpTo(10 /*or 9 maybe*/, (i) => Console.WriteLine(i * i));

If you wanted this, then you could write an extension method like this:

public static void UpTo(this int start, int end, Action<int> proc)
{
    for (int i = start; i < end; i++)
        proc(i);
}

Change < to <= if you want an inclusive upper bound.

share|improve this answer
    
You beated me on time: upvoted! :) –  Marco Nov 17 '11 at 8:19
6  
I know this is what the OP asked for, but the syntax stinks: 10.UpTo(i => Console.WriteLine(i * i)); ... That would make no sense to me except for the fact that I know extension methods and the dirty tricks they afford :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 17 '11 at 8:21
    
@MerlynMorgan-Graham: Noted. –  George Duckett Nov 17 '11 at 8:22
    
We have a winner! Thanks George! –  dharmatech Nov 17 '11 at 8:25
3  
I much prefer the 0.UpTo(10, /*blah*/) version, it's more intuitive and more readable. –  Doctor Jones Nov 17 '11 at 16:39

Try this:

public static class IntExtensions
{
    public static void UpTo(this int n, Action<int> proc)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            proc(i);
    }
}

With this you could write

10.UpTo(i => Console.WriteLine(i * i));

The function I wrote is called an extension method.
At design time you notice is not a native function because it has a different icon.
Estension methods are static methods or functions included in a static class and type they work on is the first param on which you must use this keyword.
In IntExtensions class you could write all methods you please; grouping them inside the same static class makes you easy manage them.

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Awesome answer, thanks Marco! –  dharmatech Nov 17 '11 at 8:35

wanna do it in one line ? here it goes:

Enumerable.Range(0, 9).Select(i => i * i).ToList().ForEach(j=>Console.WriteLine("%d",j));
share|improve this answer
1  
Cool answer. :-) –  dharmatech Nov 17 '11 at 8:33
4  
Why is ToList() required? –  tomp Nov 21 '11 at 8:19
5  
The 'ToList()' is required to call 'ForEach' as it's only exposed on lists and arrays. –  Michael Arnell Nov 22 '11 at 17:20

Try Enumerable.Range, possibly in combination with Take or TakeWhile:

IEnumerable<int> values = Enumerable.Range(0, 20)
    .Take(10); // Not necessary in this example

foreach(var value in values)
{
    Console.WriteLine(value);
}

// or ...

foreach(var i in Enumerable.Range(0, 10))
{
    Console.WriteLine(i * i);
}

There is a ForEach on List<T> that you could use to get closer syntax to what you want, but I consider it bad form. It takes a pure query/filter/transform syntax, that works in an effectively immutable fashion, and introduces side-effects.

For your future amusement you might want to check out extension methods, IEnumerable<T>, and yield return. A lot of generator-type functionality and interesting syntax becomes possible when you use those three things in combination. Although I would argue that this particular example isn't the best place to use them because the resulting syntax becomes a mess.

share|improve this answer

Make your method like this in a static class "Extensions" for example:

public static void UpTo(this int n, Action<int> proc)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
        proc(i);
}

And the usage:

var n = 10;
n.UpTo(i => Console.WriteLine(i * i));

Hope this helps! :)

share|improve this answer

Take a look at LINQ TakeWhile or for your specific case of integers, use Enumerable.Range

Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Select(i => ...);

Arguably you shouldn't be putting an Action on the end there, see comments on ForEach here.

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