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Like many people these days I've been trying the different features that C+11 brings. One of my favorites is the "range-based for loops".

I understand that:

for(Type& v : a) { ... }

Is equivalent to:

for(auto iv = begin(a); iv != end(a); ++iv)
{
  Type& v = *iv;
  ...
}

And that begin() simply returns a.begin() for standard containers.

But what if I want to make my custom type "range-based for loop"-aware ?

Should I just specialize begin() and end() ?

If my custom type belongs to the namespace xml, should I define xml::begin() or std::begin() ?

In short, what are the guidelines to do that ?

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3  
Use the ADL, luke... –  PlasmaHH Nov 17 '11 at 9:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 44 down vote accepted

The relevant part of the standard is 6.5.4/1:

if _RangeT is a class type, the unqualified-ids begin and end are looked up in the scope of class _RangeT as if by class member access lookup (3.4.5), and if either (or both) finds at least one declaration, begin- expr and end-expr are __range.begin() and __range.end(), respectively;

— otherwise, begin-expr and end-expr are begin(__range) and end(__range), respectively, where begin and end are looked up with argument-dependent lookup (3.4.2). For the purposes of this name lookup, namespace std is an associated namespace.

So, you can do any of the following:

  • define begin and end member functions
  • define begin and end free functions that will be found by ADL (simplified version: put them in the same namespace as the class)
  • specialize std::begin and std::end

std::begin calls the begin() member function anyway, so if you only implement one of the above, then the results should be the same no matter which one you choose. That's the same results for ranged-based for loops, and also the same result for mere mortal code that doesn't have its own magical name resolution rules so just does using std::begin; followed by an unqualified call to begin(a).

If you implement the member functions and the ADL functions, though, then range-based for loops should call the member functions, whereas mere mortals will call the ADL functions. Best make sure they do the same thing in that case!

If the thing you're writing implements the container interface, then it will have begin() and end() member functions already, which should be sufficient. If it's a range that isn't a container (which would be a good idea if it's immutable or if you don't know the size up front), you're free to choose.

Of the options you lay out, note that you must not overload std::begin(). You are permitted to specialize standard templates for a user-defined type, but aside from that, adding definitions to namespace std is undefined behavior. But anyway, specializing standard functions is a poor choice if only because the lack of partial function specialization means you can only do it for a single class, not for a class template.

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Aren't there certain requirements that the iterator much meet? ie be a ForwardIterator or something along those lines. –  Pubby Dec 17 '12 at 7:44
2  
@Pubby: Looking at 6.5.4, I think InputIterator is sufficient. But actually I don't think the type returned has to be an iterator at all for range-based for. The statement is defined in the standard by what it's equivalent to, so it's enough to implement only the expressions used in the code in the standard: operators !=, prefix ++ and unary *. It's probably unwise to implement begin() and end() member functions or non-member ADL functions that return anything other than an iterator, but I think it's legal. Specializing std::begin to return a non-iterator is UB, I think. –  Steve Jessop Dec 17 '12 at 12:01
    
Are you sure that you must not overload std::begin? I ask because the standard library does so in a few cases itself. –  ThreeBit Apr 1 '13 at 22:18
    
@ThreeBit: yes, I'm sure. The rules for standard library implementations are different from the rules for programs. –  Steve Jessop Apr 1 '13 at 23:13

Should I just specialize begin() and end() ?

As far as I know, that is enough. You also have to make sure that incrementing the pointer would get from the begin to the end.

Next example (it is missing const version of begin and end) compiles and works fine.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

int i=0;

struct A
{
    A()
    {
        std::generate(&v[0], &v[10], [&i](){  return ++i;} );
    }
    int * begin()
    {
        return &v[0];
    }
    int * end()
    {
        return &v[10];
    }

    int v[10];
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    for( auto it : a )
    {
        std::cout << it << std::endl;
    }
}

Here is another example with begin/end as functions. They have to be in the same namespace as the class, because of ADL :

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>


namespace foo{
int i=0;

struct A
{
    A()
    {
        std::generate(&v[0], &v[10], [&i](){  return ++i;} );
    }

    int v[10];
};

int *begin( A &v )
{
    return &v.v[0];
}
int *end( A &v )
{
    return &v.v[10];
}
} // namespace foo

int main()
{
    foo::A a;
    for( auto it : a )
    {
        std::cout << it << std::endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. But what if I don't have my own class but only my custom iterators ? begin and end should then be free functions but in which namespace ? –  ereOn Nov 17 '11 at 9:32
1  
@ereOn In the same namespace where the class is defined. See the 2nd example –  BЈовић Nov 17 '11 at 9:43
    
Thank you for your answer :) And congratulations for your first 10K :) –  ereOn Nov 17 '11 at 9:52
1  
Congratulations as well :) It might be worth mentionning the terms Argument Dependent Lookup (ADL) or Koenig Lookup for the second example (to explain why the free function should be in the same namespace as the class it operates on). –  Matthieu M. Nov 17 '11 at 10:11
1  
@ereOn: actually, you don't. ADL is about extending the scopes to look-up to automatically include the namespaces that the arguments belong to. There is a good ACCU article about overload resolution, which unfortunately skips the name lookup part. The name lookup involves collecting candidates function, you start by looking in the current scope + the scopes of the arguments. If no name is found that match, you move up to the parent scope of the current scope and search again... until you reach the global scope. –  Matthieu M. Nov 17 '11 at 10:23

In case you want to back a class's iteration directly with its std::vector or std::map member, here is the code for that:

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
#include <string>
using std::string;
#include <vector>
using std::vector;
#include <map>
using std::map;


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////
/// classes
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////

class VectorValues {
private:
    vector<int> v = vector<int>(10);

public:
    vector<int>::iterator begin(){
        return v.begin();
    }
    vector<int>::iterator end(){
        return v.end();
    }
    vector<int>::const_iterator begin() const {
        return v.begin();
    }
    vector<int>::const_iterator end() const {
        return v.end();
    }
};

class MapValues {
private:
    map<string,int> v;

public:
    map<string,int>::iterator begin(){
        return v.begin();
    }
    map<string,int>::iterator end(){
        return v.end();
    }
    map<string,int>::const_iterator begin() const {
        return v.begin();
    }
    map<string,int>::const_iterator end() const {
        return v.end();
    }

    const int& operator[](string key) const {
        return v.at(key);
    }
    int& operator[](string key) {
        return v[key];
    } 
};


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////
/// main
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////

int main() {
    // VectorValues
    VectorValues items;
    int i = 0;
    for(int& item : items) {
        item = i;
        i++;
    }
    for(int& item : items)
        cout << item << " ";
    cout << endl << endl;

    // MapValues
    MapValues m;
    m["a"] = 1;
    m["b"] = 2;
    m["c"] = 3;
    for(auto pair: m)
        cout << pair.first << " " << pair.second << endl;
}
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I write my answer because some people might be more happy with simple real life example without STL includes.

I have my own plain only data array implementation for some reason, and I wanted to use the range based for loop. Here is my solution:

 template <typename DataType>
 class PodArray
 {
 public:
 class iterator
 {
 public:
 iterator(DataType * ptr): ptr(ptr){}
 iterator operator++() { iterator i(ptr); ++ptr; return i; }
 bool operator!=(const iterator & other) { return ptr != other.ptr; }
 const DataType& operator*() const { return *ptr; }
 private:
 DataType* ptr;
 };
 private:
 unsigned len;
 DataType *val;
 public:
 iterator begin() const { return iterator(val); }
 iterator end() const { return iterator(val + len); }

 // rest of the container definition not related to the question ...
 };

Then the usage example:

 PodArray<char> array;
 // fill up array in some way
 for(auto& c : array)
 printf("char: %c\n", c);
share|improve this answer
1  
The example has the begin() and end() methods, and also have a basic (easy to understand) example iterator class that can easily be adjusted for any custom container type. Comparing std::array<> and any possible alternate implementation is a different question, and in my opinion has nothing to do with the range-based for loop. –  csjpeter Mar 9 at 6:26

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