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How to exchange bits of given integer number {p, p+1, ..., p+k-1} with {q, q+1, ..., q+k-1} in case where we have an overlap of both bits intervals; p and q are bit's positions:
p != q; k > 1.

Example:

p = 5;
q = 8;
k = 6;
16-bits decimal number 30 000 in binary representation:
01110101 00110000
================before exchange============
     101 001
  110101
================after exchange==============
     110 101
  101001
============================================

How to decide for bit's positions 8, 9 and 10, which bits to put - 110 or 001?

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2  
What have you tried? –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 17 '11 at 9:29
    
I've solved it, but only for the case when there is not an overlap. –  nenito Nov 17 '11 at 9:33
    
Which is right surely is just a matter of definition? I'd personally be inclined to say that overlapping is not valid but really it looks like its up to you what you do... –  Chris Nov 17 '11 at 9:33
1  
@MerlynMorgan-Graham: the question is not about implementation but about how to define the operation as far as I can see. Its the last line that is the key one. And the OP didn't seem to imply that he had direct access to memory so I'm not sure that -1ing him for that is fair. I assume the intent is to just scramble bits for some reason. –  Chris Nov 17 '11 at 9:36
1  
Yeah, the question talks about overlapping bit intervals not memory positions. It's a binary math question and a valid one. –  soulcheck Nov 17 '11 at 9:39
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The algorithm, if allowing overlaps, must be a lossy one.

From your example:

01110101 00110000
     |     |
     101 001
  |    |
  110101

If you swap them, the values are:

01110101 00110000
     |     |
     110 101
     *** - Mismatch!
  |    |
  101001
     *** - Mismatch!

No matter what, if you allow an overlap, you cannot guarantee you can get the same original values out after doing the swap.

Two ways to deal with this problem:

  • Document that your function is lossy, and that you cannot guarantee that you will be able to extract the swapped bits back out.
    I don't like this idea, because I don't know what I'd use such an algorithm for
  • Throw an exception if an overlap is fed into the algorithm, and write your program that uses this algorithm in such a way that it doesn't generate overlaps.
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Such kind of algorithms are used in data encryption. –  nenito Nov 18 '11 at 6:35
1  
@nenito: That's fair. This certainly could be part of a one-way hash. If that is the case you should document which of the two inputs wins in a tie. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 18 '11 at 6:47
    
Actually, I found a better solution, that extends yours. I throw an exception only if the overlapped bits differ each other. –  nenito Nov 18 '11 at 7:18
1  
@nenito: That's fair. If it is for use in a hash, I'd check with that algorithm's requirements. It may be an intentional part of the algorithm that the bits be mangled, in which case you'd need to follow the logic it expects for the resulting hashes to be correct. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 18 '11 at 7:27
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In Java you could check needed bit using:

boolean isSet(byte number, int index) {
    return (number & (1 << index)) != 0;
}

To construct new byte you could use: Byte.valueOf(string, radix)

Also, when you work with non-byte numbers, you can change byte order using ByteBuffer (ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN / ByteOrder.BIG_ENDIAN)

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