Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wanted to ask if exist a another implementation of setTimeout / clearTimeout to replace this kind of nested structure avoiding the loop back

function timedCount()
{
    document.getElementById('txt').value=c;
    c=c+1;
    t=setTimeout("timedCount()",1000);
}

function stopCount()
{
    clearTimeout(t);
    timer_is_on=0;
}

I have read is too dangerous to have an infinite nested loop, because at an indeterminate moment the client will collapse due the insuficient memory.

I want to ask too What happen with clearTimeout() method? Does it clear the memory stack?

share|improve this question
1  
    
It's not a recursive call; timedCount exits. –  Dave Newton Nov 17 '11 at 10:33
1  
@DaveNewton, it's usually called recursive timeout (even if there is technically no recursion) when a function passes itself to a timeout –  Esailija Nov 17 '11 at 10:35
    
@Esailija Could be, but it's misleading, as the OP's question demonstrates. –  Dave Newton Nov 17 '11 at 11:48
    
@DaveNewton Yeah I think that the lazy explanation given for recursion sometimes ("it's a function that calls itself") has lead to using that... I'll edit my post a little –  Esailija Nov 17 '11 at 13:33

4 Answers 4

the "recursive" timeout pattern is definitely not dangerous (nor recursive) by itself but just to be sure use it like this:

function timedCount()
{
    document.getElementById('txt').value=c;
    c=c+1;
    window.t=setTimeout( timedCount, 1000 );
}

function stopCount()
{
    clearTimeout(window.t);
    timer_is_on=0;
}

It is in fact more safe than setInterval because if an error is happening in setInterval call , it just keeps doing it over and over and over again...

(function updatePage(){
throw new Error( "computer is not turned on" );
setTimeout( updatePage, 1000 );
})()

function updatePageDumb(){
throw new Error( "computer is not turned on" );
}

setInterval( updatePageDumb, 1000 );
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you very much for your answer my friend –  Thomas Patrick kairuz Nov 17 '11 at 10:46

Why not use setInterval and clearInterval instead?

share|improve this answer
3  
setTimeout is a tad safer than setInterval, because you're guaranteed (more or less) the minimum delay between each run. With setInterval, your function is scheduled to run at specific intervals, meaning that if the code takes longer than the interval to execute, you'll get stuck in a loop. That's not such a big deal here because the delay is quite large (1s), but it's still a good practice to use setTimeout instead. –  Andy E Nov 17 '11 at 10:36
    
@AndyE - I know the timing rules are different, but does this really mean that the browser will "get stuck" (as in not processing other events) when an interval is running that continuously exceeds the time between its invocations? –  Jonas H Nov 17 '11 at 10:41
    
yeah, it can lock up the UI because the thread is constantly executing JS code. –  Andy E Nov 17 '11 at 10:54
    
What happen is the webpage is running trought a mounth or year, I have read that recursive functions are dangerous, suppose I have fired 10.000 millons of time this function will exist 10.000 millons of time and can tilt the browser, or this isnt a problem? –  Thomas Patrick kairuz Nov 17 '11 at 11:06
    
@ThomasPatrickkairuz There is no recursive function in the tehcnical recursive sense that those articles are referring to... there is no problem. There are also many practical perks.. such as being able to stop it with a simple return; instead of having to keep the identifier around. Being able to change the timeout for the next call on some condition and so on. –  Esailija Nov 17 '11 at 11:13

setTimeout is not a recursive call, it sets an internal timer that fires once and then self-destructs. The call to setTimeout ends right after the timer is created and so the function exits normally. Therefore, your code should work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
what happen with the recursive function, If I shot it 100.000 millons of time, I will have 100.000 functions and exist the posibility to tilt the browser –  Thomas Patrick kairuz Nov 17 '11 at 11:07
    
Well, if you do so, you'll definitely run into an unpleasant situation (browser will eat up memory and CPU and, hopefully, terminate your script). –  Lyth Nov 17 '11 at 11:23

A few pointers:

1) Since you are trying to access a dom element, it is better to check if the element is present in the DOM.

Since you are already using jQuery, it is advisable to have all this code inside $(document).ready().

2) clearTimeout removes the reference t in this case from the memory and any later reference to it will result in unpredictable results. The variable t is actually used in case you want to clear off the timeout from an element at some point.

3) Passing the value timedCount() in string form implies JS will have to apply an eval to get its value, which in this case refers to a function. http://www.jslint.org. JS standards ask to avoid eval uses. It is better to use an anonymous function here, that in turn calls the desired function timedCount().

4) As far as another implementation goes, it really depends on how and when you want your stopCount() function to be called. In your implementation, it will actually never be called as it keeps calling the same function after a span of 1 sec.

The desired code could be something like

function timedCount()
{
    // the first 2 lines doing something
    t = setTimeout(function()
    {
        // if clear time out logic
        if ( can_clear_timeout() )
        {
            stopCount();
        }
        else
        {
            return timedCount();
        }
    }, 1000);
}

5) Another warning is one should not use global variables like timer_is_on as it is against the standards.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, t is not a reference to anything. It's a primitive Number. Also, nothing happens to t when you pass it to clearTimeout. You can even clear timeouts just by guessing (or bruteforcing) a Number, as in clearTimeout(5); –  Esailija Nov 17 '11 at 11:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.